Roofing scam sees companies targeted by email fraudsters

Roofing scam sees companies targeted by email fraudsters

At least three roofing companies in Waterloo Region have recently been targeted by a complex scam involving recently sold houses.

Rhys Williams of The Roofman Inc. says an email requesting an estimate on replacing a certain home’s roof in Kitchener left him “a little bit suspicious.”

There was no obvious red flag, but there were a number of things about the email that seemed a little off. It had several spelling and punctuation issues. The sender had an American phone number and claimed he had learned of The Roofman Inc. through Yelp, an American website.

The property in question had recently been sold. Real estate agent Michelle Wobst says she’s aware of at least three roofing companies that received similar emails about it.

One company – concerned that they were being scammed – called Wobst to confirm if the name on the email was the name of either the buyer or the seller. It wasn’t.

“They were kind of skeptical as to why somebody would be doing the roof during the process of selling,” she said.

Another company was a little less skeptical. Last week, the seller woke up and noticed a crane in her driveway and shingles being loaded onto her roof.

That roofing company had been sent a cheque containing a full payment for the supposed roof replacement job – and a little extra. The emailer had asked them to return the difference through an email transfer.

“Obviously the first cheque isn’t going to clear, and now this guy’s out like $1,500,” Wobst says.

At The Roofman Inc., it was the third time a similar scammer had tried to get them. Williams has one piece of advice for any roofing companies unsure if a questionable request is legitimate.

“If you can’t get a face-to-face with the potential client … you should definitely consider doing more research,” he says.

Police say homeowners who see a construction crew performing unexpected work at their home around the time of a sale or purchase should contact their real estate agent to determine exactly what is happening.

With reporting by Max Wark

Strong winds blow roof off Coventry house

The gable end of a roof has been blown off a three-storey town house by strong winds, leaving a pile of bricks at the foot of the property.

Firefighters shared images of the destruction caused during the early hours at the home on Burroughs Close in Stoke Heath, Coventry.

Foleshill fire station tweeted that “luckily” there were no injuries.

Severe gales have been causing disruption to much of the UK – with gusts of up to 70 mph (113 kph).

Roof end blown offImage caption“Our first thought was that it’s going to keep collapsing”, Mowa Errabou said

The family who live in the house told the BBC they were sleeping when the roof came down.

Mowa Errabou, 21, said they heard a loud bang and said “our first thought was that it’s going to keep collapsing”.

“We heard strong winds throughout the night but we didn’t think it would go this far. We kept hearing a few garden gates shut hard, but we weren’t expecting that.

“When we came outside we just saw the damage and thought, ‘wow, thank god it happened at night time’.

“We were thinking of converting the attic into a room not long ago, but thank god we didn’t.”

Elsewhere in Warwickshire, about 200 homes in Rugby are without power.

This post was taken from http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-coventry-warwickshire-42729755

 

How do you know if you have asbestos?

How do you know if you have asbestos?

As a commercial property owner of premises leased or rented to business, you may have management or control of your premises. 

Use this checklist to help you find and identify asbestos in your building or structure.

  • Identify when the building was constructed

Asbestos was widely used as a construction and insulation material in buildings constructed before the late-1980s. Australia banned the use or import of blue and brown asbestos or asbestos products in the mid-1980s, and banned all manufacture or import of white asbestos products in December 2003.

However, building materials may have been stockpiled, stored or recycled and used in the construction of buildings after the bans came into place. This means there is still a chance that asbestos containing materials may be in buildings constructed after the mid-1980s.

Of course any refurbishment or extensions to an original building before the mid-1980s may have used asbestos containing materials. Just because the original parts of the building do not contain asbestos, you should not assume that additions do not.

  • Identify what materials were used in constructing the building

Think about your building’s main construction materials. Is it constructed from timber, brick, steel, cement sheet or another material?

If you have cement sheet, there’s a chance it could contain asbestos fibres bonded to cement particles. For example, if a roof is made from corrugated cement sheeting, there’s a chance it contains asbestos.

Because of the hardiness and waterproofing qualities of asbestos, areas of the building prone to wet conditions like bathrooms, toilets and laundries may have asbestos sheeting or asbestos vinyl tiles in the walls and floors. Likewise, pipes throughout the building that carry water and sewage may also contain asbestos.

  • Do a walkthrough inspection to find asbestos

Conduct a thorough inspection of all buildings and structures including all rooms and spaces, ceiling spaces, cellars, shafts, storage areas and wall cavities.

You should always assume material contains asbestos, or get it tested when:

– it can’t be identified

– it can’t be accessed and is likely to contain asbestos

– you otherwise can’t be sure it doesn’t contain asbestos.

The design plans for a building, structure, ship or plant may help in identifying inaccessible areas. Talking to builders, architects, manufacturers of plant and maintenance employees can also help. Experience and findings from inspections of similar sections of the building (or similar buildings) may also be helpful.

It’s important to take notes and photos during your inspection because the notes can be used to produce the asbestos register.You can find more information about asbestos registers in the Manage Asbestos section

  • Use a competent person to identify asbestos

Anyone inspecting for asbestos, determining risk, or recommending control measures must be competent to do so.

To be competent a person should:

– have appropriate training, knowledge and experience in identifying suspected asbestos materials and be able to determine risk and appropriate controls

– be familiar with building and construction practices to determine where asbestos is likely to be present

– be able to determine that material may be friable or non-friable and evaluate its condition.

If you do not have the capability to identify asbestos, then you should use an external providers, for example, a consultant.

  • Selecting an external provider

When selecting an external provider, you should consider:

– their background and experience

– their specific expertise

– their qualifications or professional affiliations

– references from previous work (consider asking for examples of reports prepared for other clients).

An example of a suitably competent person may be an occupational hygienist with experience in identifying asbestos and assessing its associated risks.

An occupational hygienist who specialises in asbestos can provide advice on:

– identifying asbestos in a workplace

– developing an asbestos register

– reviewing an asbestos register

– the sampling of asbestos fibres in the air and the comparison of these to the asbestos exposure standard

– provision of a clearance certificate

How to find an Occupational Hygienist
You can find a qualified Occupational Hygienist through the Australian Institute of Occupational HygienistsThis external link will open in a new window.

National Association of Testing Authority
A suitably competent person may also be found at companies approved by the National Association of Testing AuthoritiesThis external link will open in a new window (NATA) 

  • Taking samples of asbestos

If samples are taken for the purpose of determining if asbestos is present, it is important that representative samples are taken. If there are variations in appearance, texture or colour of the material you’ll need to take additional samples for consistency and valid analysis. For example, full-thickness samples of friable material back to the substrate should be taken. You should also consider taking samples from difficult areas where there is evidence of previous asbestos removals.

The analysis must be undertaken [insert the Asbestos Samples] by a person who is suitably trained and experienced in a safe method of taking samples of asbestos-containing materials.

Samples should be taken in a controlled manner that does not create a risk to the person taking the sample, or people who will work or visit the area where the sample was taken. People taking samples should assess the risk and implement appropriate controls. These may include the use of a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtered vacuum cleaner and/or a water spray bottle to suppress airborne dust (a respirator – approved by AS/NZS 1716:2003 Respiratory protective devices – may also be used to minimise exposure).

Samples need to be placed in sealed containers (for example, snap-lock durable bags) and appropriately labelled so that it’s clear where the sample was taken.

Find out more about taking asbestos samples

  • Arrange for analysis of asbestos samples

Under the Occupational Health and Safety Regulations 2007, only approved analysts can analyse samples containing asbestos.

An approved asbestos analyst is an analyst approved by NATA to perform asbestos fibre counting or to identify asbestos in samples and to issue findings as endorsed reports under the authority of a NATA-accredited laboratory.

Before you take a sample to a laboratory, you should confirm the laboratory is accredited to perform asbestos analysis. You can do this by visiting National Association of Testing AuthoritiesThis external link will open in a new window (NATA).

The laboratory will give you a report of your asbestos sample. Endorsed reports have the NATA insignia stamped on the report. You should keep the endorsed report as evidence of compliance.

 

Why is asbestos dangerous?

Why is asbestos dangerous?

  • Asbestos still kills around 5000 workers each year, this is  more than the number of people killed on the road.
  • Around 20 tradesman die each week as a result of past exposure
  • However, asbestos is not just a problem of the past. It can be present today in any building built or refurbished before the year 2000.

When materials that contain asbestos are disturbed or damaged, fibres are released into the air. When these fibres are inhaled they can cause serious diseases. These diseases will not affect you immediately; they often take a long time to develop, but once diagnosed, it is often too late to do anything. This is why it is important that you protect yourself now.

Asbestos can cause the following fatal and serious diseases:

Mesothelioma

Mesothelioma is a cancer which affects the lining of the lungs (pleura) and the lining surrounding the lower digestive tract (peritoneum). It is almost exclusively related to asbestos exposure and by the time it is diagnosed, it is almost always fatal.

Asbestos-related lung cancer

Asbestos-related lung cancer is the same as (looks the same as) lung cancer caused by smoking and other causes. It is estimated that there is around one lung cancer for every mesothelioma death.

Asbestosis

Asbestosis is a serious scarring condition of the lung that normally occurs after heavy exposure to asbestos over many years. This condition can cause progressive shortness of breath, and in severe cases can be fatal.

Pleural thickening

Pleural thickening is generally a problem that happens after heavy asbestos exposure. The lining of the lung (pleura) thickens and swells. If this gets worse, the lung itself can be squeezed, and can cause shortness of breath and discomfort in the chest.

Note: It is also important to remember that people who smoke, and are also exposed to asbestos fibres, are at a much greater risk of developing lung cancer.

 

This post was taken from http://www.hse.gov.uk/asbestos/dangerous.htm

Where can you find asbestos?

Where can you find asbestos? From HSE.GOV.UK

Asbestos can be found in any industrial or residential building built or refurbished before the year 2000. It is in many of the common materials used in the building trade that you may come across during your work.

INDUSTRIAL PROPERTY

Inside

1. Sprayed coatings on ceilings, walls, beams and columns

2. Asbestos cement water tank

3. Loose fill insulation

4. Lagging on boilers and pipes

5. AIB ceiling tiles

6. Toilet seat and cistern

7. AIB partition walls

8. AIB panels in fire doors

9. Asbestos rope seals, gaskets and paper

10. Vinyl floor tiles

11. AIB around boilers

12. Textiles eg fire blankets

13. Textured decorating coatings on walls and ceilings eg artex

Outside

14. Asbestos cement roof

15. Asbestos cement panels

16. Asbestos cement gutters and downpipes

17. Soffits – AIB or asbestos cement

18. Asbestos cement flue

AIB = Asbestos Insulating Board

Residential Property

Inside

A. Asbestos cement Water tank

B. Pipe lagging

C. Loose fill insulation

D. Textured decorative coating eg artex

E. AIB ceiling tiles

F. AIB bath panel

G. Toilet seat and cistern

H. AIB behind fuse box

I. AIB airing cupboard and/or sprayed insulation coating boiler

J. AIB partition wall

K. AIB interior window panel

L. AIB around boiler

M. Vinyl floor tiles

N. AIB behind fire

Outside

O. Gutters andAsbestos cement downpipes

P. Soffits – AIB or asbestos cement

Q. AIB exterior window panel

R. Asbestos cement roof

S. Asbestos cement panels

T. Roofing felt

AIB = Asbestos Insulating Board

All information in this article is only from http://www.hse.gov.uk/asbestos/building.htm website.

No need to feel blue with new roof guidance

No need to feel blue with new roof guidance

Technical guidance for the construction and design of blue roofs has been released by the National Federation of Roofing Contractors.

The information was put together by the NFRC Joint Flat Roofing Technical Committee whose members included membrane and system manufacturers, insulation producers, standards and certification bodies, drainage consultants and representatives from flat roofing trade associations.

Kevin Taylor, head of technical services at the National Federation of Roofing Contractors, said: “No British or European standard covers this type of application so we were tasked with producing these notes to support the design of technically correct Blue Roof construction.

“We hope that this – like Green Roof Code of Practice (GRO) has done for green roofing – will provide comprehensive information and guidance for specifiers, designers and installers of blue roofs.”

The guidance includes sections on drainage, roof deck construction, falls, waterproofing, outlets, overflows, components and finishes.

A Blue Roof is a flat roof designed to allow controlled attenuation of rain fall during heavy and storm events as part of a Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems (SuDS) good practise policy, replicating the natural environment or improving the as built environment.

It treats and releases the water at a managed and controlled rate directly into the sewers waterways and river systems.

Kevin added: “At the NFRC we help our members plan ahead and see both green and blue roof systems as providing sustainable roof drainage solutions for our sector.”

www.nfrc.co.uk

 

Roof Maintenance

Repairing or replacing your roof can be expensive. Spending a few minutes every six months looking closely at your roof can help you identify roof maintenance opportunities that will help prevent costly repairs later. It’s also important to periodically check your homeowners insurance to make sure that serious roof damage is covered by your policy.

Roof maintenance: What to look for

It’s critical that you inspect your roof every spring and fall. A good time to do this is when you’re cleaning your gutters.

Look for missing, damaged or curling shingles and any other signs of wear and tear. It’s easy and inexpensive to replace one or two shingles, or to hire someone to do it for you.
Check for signs of fungus or algae. If your roof is starting to collect moss or algae, install zinc or lead control strips.
Inspect metal areas for rust. If it’s present, wire brush the rust, then prime and paint the metal.
Examine the flashing to make sure it’s solid. If not, remove all of the old caulk and scrub the area clean before resealing.
Seal any cracked mortar or caulking around joints and chimneys, if it appears to be deteriorating.
If you see any signs of leaking, like dark spots on the ceiling, or mold or dampness in your attic, take action immediately. Roof leaks get worse, not better, and it’s better to spend a few dollars on roof maintenance rather than a lot on a big repair.

Other roof maintenance issues

Sweep or blow off excess debris on the roof. Sticks, leaves and other debris can damage shingles, cause algae to grow and eventually clog the gutters.
Trim any branches that are hanging over the roof to prevent damage and keep squirrels and raccoons away.
A thick layer of snow accumulation could lead to roof collapse. If this happens, carefully pull the snow off the roof using a snow rake available at most home improvement stores.
Roof maintenance is often ignored, but small problems with a roof can lead to some of the most costly home repairs around.

Product, coverage, discounts, insurance terms, definitions, and other descriptions are intended for informational purposes only and do not in any way replace or modify the definitions and information contained in your individual insurance contracts, policies, and/or declaration pages from Allied-affiliated underwriting companies, which are controlling. Such products, coverage, terms, and discounts may vary by state and exclusions may apply.

Roof Shingling Tips and Tricks

Roof Shingling Tips and Tricks

Roof shingling is an easy job to do yourself, especially if you use a few shortcuts that don’t compromise the quality of your work. Keep in mind that safety should always be your first priority when it comes to doing any construction work on a roof. With the proper equipment and know-how, you will be able to complete your shingling jobs without wasting money or time.

Shingle Over Shingles

 

Some professionals will suggest that you not place new shingles over the top of existing shingles. The reason is that asphalt shingles have a lifespan of up to 20 years. Placing multiple layers of shingles will give your roof time to develop problems that can’t be easily detected if the roof is stacked with shingles. It is acceptable, however, to add new shingles over existing shingles. The rule is that there should not be more than 3 layers of shingles already placed. While this is a time saving shortcut, it is best practice to strip the roof to inspect for any damaged areas of the roof.

The Best Roof Stripping Tool

On occasion you will see do it yourself roofers armed with a crowbar to strip the shingles from their roof. The best and most convenient tool for this job is called a Roofer’s Spade. This tool is very similar to a snow shovel but is out-fitted with teeth or notches in the front of the shovel and a fulcrum underneath. This allows the prying up of the shingles and nails to be much easier than using a crowbar or a regular shovel

 

Rent a Dumpster

When stripping your roof, there will be lots of debris that will come from atop, including nails. Instead of throwing the loosened shingles and nails into the back of your truck and causing damage, you can call your local equipment rental company and rent a dumpster. This will allow you to throw the debris directly into the dumpster and call the company to pick it up when 

 

you are done.

Underlay

The purpose of underlay is to be that second layer of waterproof and leakage protection on your roof. While many professionals and do it yourself experts will disagree, an underlay is not necessary to install before you add your shingles on your roof. If your shingles are properly installed, you will not have to be concerned with any roof leakage issues. Although adding an underlay of felt has become the industry standard for asphalt shingles, it is not crucially needed.

Ice Guard

When you have completely stripped your roof of all shingles, walk the roof again to check for any nails that didn’t come up during your initial sweep. Remove them if there are any and prepare your roof for an application of roof guard. Ice guard is waterproof membrane that will help protect your roof from water damage. Ensure you follow the directions of use and application.

 

 

Bar Magnet

Trying to find all the nails that fell from your roof to the ground is an all day job that you don’t have time for. To remedy this issue, tie a rope to a bar magnet and drag it along the perimeter of your house. You will pick up all the nails that your eyes could not see.

5 tips to think about when renovating roof

5 tips to think about when renovating, repairing and replacing your roof

1. Roofs should ideally be inspected twice a year or more, both from the outside (with binoculars) and inside the loft. If you can see daylight in the loft, there may be something missing on the outside. Roof tiles or slates that have broken, slipped or been blown off are a common occurrence. If they’re not replaced, rainwater will get into the loft and cause damage there, and then in the rooms below. Other parts of the roof can cause leaks and damp, too, including the flashing, guttering and chimneys. You may be able to spot these problems yourself, but will usually need a roofer to put them right.

2.If the roof has to be retiled, do you replace the tiles like for like or go for something different, provided there are no planning restrictions? “Although handmade tiles look great, they can make the job more time consuming – you may need an experienced roofing team to manage the materials,” says Simon Braithwaite, category manager at builders merchant Travis Perkins. “Handmade tiles are also expensive. Expect to pay around £1,000 per 1,000 tiles – the average detached house requires 8,000 tiles. Another consideration is the area – if you live in a rustic village, handmade tiles may be much more in keeping with your surroundings.”


3“Handcrafted tiles, which are tiles that have been dealt with by hand during part of the production process, usually cost much less than handmade ones,” says Braithwaite. “If you have a smaller budget, machine-made clay or concrete tiles are the most affordable options. Concrete tiles can degrade in appearance and structure over time, whereas clay lasts much longer and is more aesthetically pleasing.” He continues: “Another consideration is the roof pitch – you can’t use certain types of tile on certain roof pitches because they don’t look good and could cause structural problems.”


4 If you’re overhauling a roof, think about fitting skylights (again as long as there are no planning restrictions). Skylights (also called roof windows) come in all shapes and sizes and can make a big difference to the amount of light entering the room below. If you’re doing major building work, such as an extension or loft conversion, skylights are a great addition, but they can also transform existing rooms with little or no natural light. While fitting a skylight is usually a job for a roofer or builder, experienced DIYers can fit them. You may think that skylights are expensive, but they don’t have to be – the Tyrem range at Screwfix starts at £161.22 for a 550mm x 780mm double-glazed skylight. These skylights are straightforward to fit, have a handle instead of a bar, which can make opening and closing them easier, and come with a 10-year manufacturer’s guarantee – just remember to get the correct flashing kit for the type of roof covering.


5 Flat roofs can be prone to leaks, not least because they should have a gradient, but the gradient often isn’t steep enough. If the roof is too flat or doesn’t have an adequate structure or materials under the roof covering, it will sag, allowing rainwater to pool and eventually enter the room below. The roof covering can also get damaged. If you’re building a single-storey extension, putting a flat roof on it will enable you to easily access the house above (to repair the guttering on the main roof, for example), but a pitched roof should be more reliable long term and is more aesthetically pleasing inside and out.

This post was taken from http://www.hamhigh.co.uk/property/how-to-re-vamp-your-roof-1-4905411

Do-It-Yourself Roofing Guide

Doing The Roofing Job / Installing Your New Roof

Preparing/Protecting The Job Area

Some general suggestions for preparing the job area:

Make sure you have a clean, organized work area. Block it off from children and pets. Identify and avoid all site danger areas, such as dangerous power lines, unsafe roof access areas, and underground hazards (such as cesspools and power lines).

Remove wall hangings as well as any loose items from walls and shelves. Use tarps to avoid damaging plants and shrubs. Park any cars or other vehicles away from the driveway and a safe distance from the construction area. Disable any sprinkler systems. Cover any pools and hot tubs, and remove any other sensitive items around the house that might be damaged by falling roofing debris.

Tearing Off The Roof And Preparing The Roof Deck

Nothing is more important in roofing than preparing the surface under the shingles. With a roof tear-off, when the old materials are removed, you’ll have a clean deck that allows you to see any potential problems that need to be fixed. This could range from rotten wood to cracked boards to an unsound deck that won’t hold nails as well.

For the proper methods for tearing off a roof and preparing the roof deck, see ourHow-To-Video .

Installing Roof Deck Protection

The proper installation of high-quality roof deck protection like Deck-Armor™ Premium Breathable Roof Deck Protection, Shingle-Mate® Roof Deck Protection, or Tiger Paw™ Roof Deck Protection is the foundation on which a good roof system is built.

See our How-to Video for installing premium deck protection .

View application instructions for roof deck protection products.

Installing Leak Barrier

Protect your investment and safeguard vulnerable areas of your roof with GAF’s proven leak barriers.

View application instructions for our leak barrier products.

Starter Strip Shingles

One of the most common sources of failure in a roof system is the improper installation of starter shingles. This starter course is very important, especially for wind resistance. Starter strip shingles are the first line of defense against wind uplift along the edges of a roof. GAF offers pre-cut WeatherBlocker™ Premium Eave/Rake Starter Strip Shingles and Pro-Start® Starter Strips.

For the proper installation technique for starter strip shingles, see our How-To Video.

Proper Shingle Nailing

Nailing errors, such as under-driven or angled nails, can cause future problems with your shingles—everything from premature failure and blistering to blow-offs. Nail type, location, length, angle, and force of application are all critical to consider when installing shingles. It’s important to take your time when installing nails to ensure the job is done correctly.

For the proper shingle nailing technique, see our How-To Video.

Installing Your Shingles

Installing Timberline® Shingles

Timberline® Shingles with Advanced Protection® Technology are the #1-selling shingles in all of North America. Timberline® Shingles will not only protect your most valuable asset—they’ll beautify your home for years to come.

For the proper installation technique for Timberline® Shingles, see our How-To Video .

View the application instructions for our Timberline® Shingles..

Installing Designer Shingles

Maximizing your property’s visual appeal with Lifetime Designer Shingles from GAF can be exciting, fun—and a smart investment.

View the application instructions for our Lifetime Designer Shingles.

How To Do Valleys

Valleys are one of the areas of roofing that takes careful planning and time to install correctly. Valleys are a prime leak area, so it’s important to be precise during installation.

See our How-to Video for installing valleys..

Installing Flashing

Wherever surfaces intersect on a roof, there is a chance of water seepage. Flashing is highly recommended for waterproofing these critical areas of your roof.

See our How-to Video for installing flashing and details.

Installing Ridge Vents

Proper ventilation is critical for helping to reduce hot and moist air in your attic space that can damage your possessions, increase your energy costs, and potentially reduce the longevity of your roofing system. The Federal Housing Authority in the U.S. the Engineered Wood Association, many national building codes, and all major roofing manufacturers require the installation of attic ventilation. GAF offers one of the industry’s most comprehensive line of ridge vents .

Installing ridge vents requires working on some of the highest parts of your roof—the ridges. Always utilize proper safety equipment to prevent falls or injury when installing ridge vents on your roof. See our Safety section for more details.

Deciding on the proper vent and the amount of ventilation needed is critical. Consult your local building code for balanced attic ventilation requirements in your area. Once you decide on the type of vent that is needed and how much to install, always ensure you install the vent as per written application instructions. Be careful not to cut any attic rafters or wires, and always ensure to properly fasten the vent to prevent blow-off or weather infiltration.

See our How-to Video for installing ridge vents.

Installing Ridge Cap Shingles

Hip or ridge cap shingles are not only a great finishing touch to your roof, they are also a critical piece of your roof system that helps to protect some of the highest stress and vulnerable areas on your roof. GAF offers premium ridge cap shinglesdesigned to match your GAF laminated shingles.

Installing hip or ridge shingles requires working on some of the highest parts of your roof—the hips and ridges. Always utilize proper safety equipment to prevent falls or injury when installing hip or ridge shingles on your roof.

See our How-to Video for installing ridge cap shingles

View application instructions for ridge cap shingles.

Installing Other Ventilation Options

GAF offers an extended line of professional-grade Master Flow® ventilation products, from whole house fans to roof louvers to turbines.

View the application instructions for our Master Flow® ventilation products

Cleaning Up The Job Site

Professional roofing contractors develop specialized techniques and equipment for keeping the jobsite clean. Tackling the job on your own, you can adopt some of these practices as well. Some quick tips are to shelter and protect bushes and plants that might be affected by material dropping from the roof, and to use a tarp to catch as much material as possible. Many roofing contractors follow a completed job by running a magnet over the "drop zone" to collect any nails that might have escaped.

Also see our section on Recycling and Waste Disposal .

How Long Will It Take?

Realistically, do-it-yourself roofing can take a lot of time and effort. It depends on various factors, such as your level of experience, the size of your roof, whether or not you need to do a complete tear-off of the existing roof, how much preparation your roof deck needs, and how many people are assisting you. Since it’s important not to leave your roof unprotected for any length of time, you must allow at least several uninterrupted days in a row to work on the project.

Keep in mind that a professional roofing contractor with a crew will finish the job more quickly and efficiently.

Locate a factory-certified GAF Master Elite® Contractor near you. >>

This post was taken from https://www.gaf.com/roofing/residential/diy/doing_the_job