Do-It-Yourself Roofing Guide

Doing The Roofing Job / Installing Your New Roof

Preparing/Protecting The Job Area

Some general suggestions for preparing the job area:

Make sure you have a clean, organized work area. Block it off from children and pets. Identify and avoid all site danger areas, such as dangerous power lines, unsafe roof access areas, and underground hazards (such as cesspools and power lines).

Remove wall hangings as well as any loose items from walls and shelves. Use tarps to avoid damaging plants and shrubs. Park any cars or other vehicles away from the driveway and a safe distance from the construction area. Disable any sprinkler systems. Cover any pools and hot tubs, and remove any other sensitive items around the house that might be damaged by falling roofing debris.

Tearing Off The Roof And Preparing The Roof Deck

Nothing is more important in roofing than preparing the surface under the shingles. With a roof tear-off, when the old materials are removed, you’ll have a clean deck that allows you to see any potential problems that need to be fixed. This could range from rotten wood to cracked boards to an unsound deck that won’t hold nails as well.

For the proper methods for tearing off a roof and preparing the roof deck, see ourHow-To-Video .

Installing Roof Deck Protection

The proper installation of high-quality roof deck protection like Deck-Armor™ Premium Breathable Roof Deck Protection, Shingle-Mate® Roof Deck Protection, or Tiger Paw™ Roof Deck Protection is the foundation on which a good roof system is built.

See our How-to Video for installing premium deck protection .

View application instructions for roof deck protection products.

Installing Leak Barrier

Protect your investment and safeguard vulnerable areas of your roof with GAF’s proven leak barriers.

View application instructions for our leak barrier products.

Starter Strip Shingles

One of the most common sources of failure in a roof system is the improper installation of starter shingles. This starter course is very important, especially for wind resistance. Starter strip shingles are the first line of defense against wind uplift along the edges of a roof. GAF offers pre-cut WeatherBlocker™ Premium Eave/Rake Starter Strip Shingles and Pro-Start® Starter Strips.

For the proper installation technique for starter strip shingles, see our How-To Video.

Proper Shingle Nailing

Nailing errors, such as under-driven or angled nails, can cause future problems with your shingles—everything from premature failure and blistering to blow-offs. Nail type, location, length, angle, and force of application are all critical to consider when installing shingles. It’s important to take your time when installing nails to ensure the job is done correctly.

For the proper shingle nailing technique, see our How-To Video.

Installing Your Shingles

Installing Timberline® Shingles

Timberline® Shingles with Advanced Protection® Technology are the #1-selling shingles in all of North America. Timberline® Shingles will not only protect your most valuable asset—they’ll beautify your home for years to come.

For the proper installation technique for Timberline® Shingles, see our How-To Video .

View the application instructions for our Timberline® Shingles..

Installing Designer Shingles

Maximizing your property’s visual appeal with Lifetime Designer Shingles from GAF can be exciting, fun—and a smart investment.

View the application instructions for our Lifetime Designer Shingles.

How To Do Valleys

Valleys are one of the areas of roofing that takes careful planning and time to install correctly. Valleys are a prime leak area, so it’s important to be precise during installation.

See our How-to Video for installing valleys..

Installing Flashing

Wherever surfaces intersect on a roof, there is a chance of water seepage. Flashing is highly recommended for waterproofing these critical areas of your roof.

See our How-to Video for installing flashing and details.

Installing Ridge Vents

Proper ventilation is critical for helping to reduce hot and moist air in your attic space that can damage your possessions, increase your energy costs, and potentially reduce the longevity of your roofing system. The Federal Housing Authority in the U.S. the Engineered Wood Association, many national building codes, and all major roofing manufacturers require the installation of attic ventilation. GAF offers one of the industry’s most comprehensive line of ridge vents .

Installing ridge vents requires working on some of the highest parts of your roof—the ridges. Always utilize proper safety equipment to prevent falls or injury when installing ridge vents on your roof. See our Safety section for more details.

Deciding on the proper vent and the amount of ventilation needed is critical. Consult your local building code for balanced attic ventilation requirements in your area. Once you decide on the type of vent that is needed and how much to install, always ensure you install the vent as per written application instructions. Be careful not to cut any attic rafters or wires, and always ensure to properly fasten the vent to prevent blow-off or weather infiltration.

See our How-to Video for installing ridge vents.

Installing Ridge Cap Shingles

Hip or ridge cap shingles are not only a great finishing touch to your roof, they are also a critical piece of your roof system that helps to protect some of the highest stress and vulnerable areas on your roof. GAF offers premium ridge cap shinglesdesigned to match your GAF laminated shingles.

Installing hip or ridge shingles requires working on some of the highest parts of your roof—the hips and ridges. Always utilize proper safety equipment to prevent falls or injury when installing hip or ridge shingles on your roof.

See our How-to Video for installing ridge cap shingles

View application instructions for ridge cap shingles.

Installing Other Ventilation Options

GAF offers an extended line of professional-grade Master Flow® ventilation products, from whole house fans to roof louvers to turbines.

View the application instructions for our Master Flow® ventilation products

Cleaning Up The Job Site

Professional roofing contractors develop specialized techniques and equipment for keeping the jobsite clean. Tackling the job on your own, you can adopt some of these practices as well. Some quick tips are to shelter and protect bushes and plants that might be affected by material dropping from the roof, and to use a tarp to catch as much material as possible. Many roofing contractors follow a completed job by running a magnet over the "drop zone" to collect any nails that might have escaped.

Also see our section on Recycling and Waste Disposal .

How Long Will It Take?

Realistically, do-it-yourself roofing can take a lot of time and effort. It depends on various factors, such as your level of experience, the size of your roof, whether or not you need to do a complete tear-off of the existing roof, how much preparation your roof deck needs, and how many people are assisting you. Since it’s important not to leave your roof unprotected for any length of time, you must allow at least several uninterrupted days in a row to work on the project.

Keep in mind that a professional roofing contractor with a crew will finish the job more quickly and efficiently.

Locate a factory-certified GAF Master Elite® Contractor near you. >>

This post was taken from https://www.gaf.com/roofing/residential/diy/doing_the_job

Do-It-Yourself Roofing Guide bannercropped

Roofing Renovation: 6 Do’s And Don’ts For Success

Roofing Renovation: 6 Do’s And Don’ts For Success

By Tom Hanzely and Robert Anderson

The lifespan of commercial roofing systems varies depending on geography, climate, roof type, and other factors, but at some point, every roofing system needs to be reevaluated. Renovations not only ensure safety for building occupants, but also verify the system will keep energy costs to a minimum and prevent problems from occurring later on. Facility managers can work with their roofing contractors to determine the best course of action for a roofing system, but it’s important the facility professional be as informed as possible when making decisions about his or her building.

Here are some do’s and don’ts to keep in mind before undergoing your next roofing renovation:

DO determine the current state of your roof. It’s important to figure out whether your roof needs an overlay or a complete tear-off and roof replacement. During a roof recover, a new membrane or roofing system is installed over the current roof, while a tear-off completely removes the roof down to an exposed deck. Part of making this decision means inspecting the roof for damage. What you’re looking for will depend on the type of roof. For instance, sloped roofs should be examined for any warping or bending, as this is a sign the roof may be nearing the end of its lifecycle.roof replacement Roofing Renovation: 6 Do’s And Don’ts For Success Roofing Renovation: 6 Do’s And Don’ts For Success insulation install firestone

If conducting a roof recover, the existing roof needs to be able to support the weight of the new roof being placed over top of it. With minimal damage from elements like moisture, placing an overlayment on top of the old roof can help keep costs down and is a quick, effective way to re-roof.

DON’T forget to inspect materials. What type of existing surfaces are on the roof? Are they in good condition? Conduct a visual inspection of the roof to determine the state of materials. For example, is the roof coating cracked? Is the rubber membrane torn? Are there visible leaks? Drainage systems should also be inspected in order to prevent any future water damage from occurring. If the current roof is equipped with polyiso insulation, it may be able to be reused and recycled. However, this will depend on whether you’re doing a complete roof replacement or simply re-covering. A tear-off will typically require more inches of insulation than a roof overlay.

roof replacement Roofing Renovation: 6 Do’s And Don’ts For Success Roofing Renovation: 6 Do’s And Don’ts For Success vegetated roof firestoneDO think long term. What is this roof being used for over the next 10 to 20 years? Will it endure heavy foot traffic? Will it face strong UV rays and high temperatures? Determining how the roof will be used will help you figure out what materials to use during the renovation to ensure an extended roof life. For instance, in some climate zones, white, reflective membranes can help ward off UV rays and keep the roof cool, helping to reduce cooling costs over time, while a vegetated roof can provide ample green space for building occupants. Vegetated roofs also offer benefits spanning from stormwater management to energy savings. However, you want the underlying roof system to be repaired, if needed, before a vegetated roof is installed over top.

DON’T overlook alternative materials. While a roof recover can be a good substitute to a replacement, there are other options to consider as well. For instance, talk with your roofing contractor about liquid-applied roof coatings to see if that may be a viable choice for your commercial building. Liquid-applied coatings are installed over your commercial roof, and in some cases, can extend an existing roof’s service life, provide energy savings, and even deliver cost savings over the long term. Keep in mind, however, the existing roof has to be in somewhat good condition before a coating is applied. Roof coatings should be used as a preventive measure to protect the roof rather than repair damage that has already been done.

DO stay up to date on building codes and standards. As a facility manager, you’re well aware of the importance of adhering to building codes and standards. Roofing codes and standards are always evolving, which means it’s critical to be in the know about when things change, and how those adjustments will impact your roofing system. Familiarize yourself with the building codes in your area, and make an effort to stay in touch with trade associations so you’re aware of any changes that will impact your building. It’s also a good idea to study basic code requirements that may apply to any commercial building.

DON’T wait for a problem to occur before renovating. Rather than waiting for a problem to arise, schedule regular roof inspections at least twice a year. This way, you’ll be able to start renovations on the roof before major problems, like roof leaks, start to occur. Even if there aren’t any visible problems with your commercial roof, it doesn’t mean a renovation or complete replacement should be put off.

While roofing renovations will vary greatly depending on the type of roofing system in place and other external factors like climate and geography, renovations are crucial for maintaining roof life, ensuring high performance and promoting a safe environment for building occupants. Establish a good working relationship with your roofing contractor to determine which approach is the best option for your building.

THis post was taken from : https://facilityexecutive.com/2017/07/roofing-renovation-6-dos-donts-success/

Top 10 Roofing Tips

Top 10 Roofing Tips

Think Safety First

Fussing to try and find a leak as soon as it happens is something that could put you in the hospital. Meddling on a roof while it's raining or covered with ice and snow isn't the ideal way to find a leak. Trying to temporarily fix a leak could be highly dangerous. If you want to do it right, there is no quick-fix. Just take your time, and be very patient and careful to wait for Mother Nature to give you the green light.

Take Precautions

Being on a roof will put the body in positions that are not comfortable or safe. Make sure to wear rubber sole shoes to prevent slipping. Also use a harness and always work with a buddy.

Spray the Roof

Take a garden hose and go up to the roof and start spraying in different locations to find the leak. Wait if it's wintertime because it's not safe to run water on the roof when it's freezing out.

Keep Gutters Clean

One of the most common areas and causes for roof leaks are clogged gutters. Gutters that have not been cleaned can cause the water to build up during rain.

Avoid Dry Rot

Dry rot isn't related to any type of water damage, but lack of ventilation. If a roof repair is right in the middle of the roof, there is a chance that the plywood might be deteriorating. The roof will actually sag in and cause the roof shingles to get brittle, crack and then leak. Preventing dry rot consists of installing a ridge vent, which will only work if there is a soffit vent. Holes have to be drilled through the soffit vents so cool air comes in through the bottom and pushes the hot air out through the top.

Prevent Ice Buildup

In the wintertime, ice has no problem building up under the roof membrane, shingles and gutters. The ice builds back up when it reaches the wall line where the house is heated and it creates an interior drip. Proper ventilation, rain and ice shields along with installing a drip edge will help prevent this problem.

Fix Roof Boots

Flashing, roofing, ice damping and skylights are all obvious places for potential leaks. One thing people often miss is the rubber boots. It's where the roof fence comes up that you find roof boots. If they dry up they will cause major leaks. It's a quick fix; purchase a new roof boot in a local hardware store. You may have to remove some of the shingles, lay a better tar under it and put it back in place.

Inspect Materials

Sometimes shingles are faulty and will begin to crack after they've been nailed down. Faulty installation with nails and shingles can also play a big part in leaks. Nails could be nailed too low and it will start pushing back up. Make sure to always check merchandise before getting on the roof.

Check Valleys

A valley is where the intersection of two roofs comes together. It is also called the ridge, which is again where two roofs meet at the top. Valleys are very common places for leaks because that's where the water from the entire roof goes to and it will start sloshing back and forth.

Eliminate Leaks

It's important not to get discouraged when a leak can't be found. It's a process of elimination. You've covered one area, installed the shingles back and sealed it watertight so at least one spot is eliminated. Now, you can try other areas.

This post was taken from http://www.diynetwork.com/

Top tips to optimally use conventional waterproofing techniques

While the first part of this two-part series examines conventional waterproofing systems and offers tips to use them for optimum effect, the second part will discuss modern waterproofing techniques. 

of building to prevent the ingress of water is an activity, which, perhaps is practiced in one form or the other, ever since the first building was built on earth. The methodology has been changing with the changes in the architectural designs and with the availability different building materials in construction.
 
In the initial stages when stone was the main building placed in position with mud or lime mortar the emphasis used to be to make the construction in such a way that the rainwater does not collect on the roofs. Hence old relied mainly on dome structures or slanting roofs. The slow speed of such construction and unaffordability of common man to build such structures for their own dwelling, made constant evolution and development in the technology.


 
With these developments the concepts of also changed. Now in present day construction wherein the ordinary and its blends with and slag materials has come to stay a lot of compatible alternatives are available for a builder to choose from various systems. Some systems are old and conventional but still practiced successfully and some are modern systems designed taking the material and structural behaviour into consideration.
 
There are some compounds, which are used in plastic concrete to make it less permeable to water. These compounds are known as integral compounds. They are based on plasticising and air-entrainment or water repellence principles. These are used as a good precautions when other factors such as good mix-design, proper mixing/placing, compacting/curing etc are taken care of. This subject of integral compounds requires in depth discussion hence will not be taken up here. Similarly there are some water proofing techniques for vertical surfaces. These techniques are also used for preserving heritage buildings by stopping/minimising the aging process of these buildings.
 
For solving water seepage problems, customers use both conventional as well as modern techniques.
 
Some of the old and conventional systems are as follows:


This system was developed during the initial stages of flat roof construction with lime mortar burnt clay brick pieces. This system involved laying lightweight mortar on the roof and spreading it to give gentle slopes for draining away the rainwater immediately. The mortar consisted of lightweight brick pieces as aggregates and ground brick with lime as binding matrix.
 
During British rule this system became more popular not because of its efficiency but because of its efficiency in keeping the interiors cool. Some applicators developed better skills in laying these systems, with neatly finished top with lines engraved on top of plastic mortar now known as IPS. Some practiced embedding broken tile or ceramic pieces in the plastic mortar and called it china mosaic.
 
This type of system remained most popular with multi-storeyed construction in all major cities. The system lasts up to 15 years if done by skilful applicators. This system may be considered more from its weather proofing abilities rather than its qualities. Once water starts entering into the brickbat coba the brick pieces absorb too much of water and the roof becomes an invisible pond of water continuously causing leakage and increasing burden on the roof slab. It will be highly beneficial if brick-bat coba is laid on a flexible membrane as water proofing as well as economical weather proofing can be achieved with this system.
 
treatment
Discovery of petroleum and its products and by-products has given the construction industry an indispensable product in the form of bitumen. Bitumen is more commonly used in the form of felt or flexible membrane formed by sandwiching jute fabric or fibreglass/polypropylene mats with chemically modified bitumen. These membranes are laid on the roofing over a bitumen primer. There are two types of membranes one is cold applied and the other hot applied which means one needs to heat the edges of the felt with a torch so that they melt and stick to the second layer in the overlap area.
 
On the roofs the bitumen felts have not been successful because of the unacceptable black appearance and inaccessibility of the terrace for other social uses. Technically it is not preferred because bitumen layer or felt on the terrace not only makes it watertight but also airtight. Concrete has the breathing property. It takes water/moisture and breathes out water vapour. Hindrance of this breathing property of concrete develops pore pressure, which causes blisters in the felt.
 
After a few seasons the blisters multiply and eventually delaminate the felt from the concrete surface. Hindrance of breathing property of concrete makes the concrete weak. But on the asbestos sheets and zinc sheets in factory roofs, this bitumen felt is the only dependable system. Hence all factory roofs in India adopt this water proofing system.
 
Bitumen is very effective in of basements from outside. Bitumen primers have very successfully been used as damp-proof course in earlier days. This practice is slowly discontinued for whatever reasons now very few engineers now believe that this was in practice once. As consequence of this absent DPC we have a lot of cases of rising dampness, which we tend to attribute to wrong reasons such as the quality or salinity of sand etc. Bitumen still is the product of first choice where it is commonly recommended, in areas such as industrial roof waterproofing, basement waterproofing, and damp-proof course. More over bitumen is the most economical product available for   
    
Metallic sheet wrapping
Because of the non-existence of suitable expansion joint filling compounds before the discovery of poly-sulphides, a complex procedure used to be adopted to treat expansion joints, in concrete dams and such huge structures utilising thick copper sheets. An extension of this practice was to try thin foils of copper and aluminium for wrapping the concrete surfaces with nagging leakage problems.
 
Unavailability of common joining material for these metal foils and the concrete and mortar created weakness in the system at the joints. This discouraged the system in its infancy only. But there after the metal manufacturers have been trying to market this type of system with improved adhesives as and when the metal market slumped.
 
based treatment
consists of two liquid components one is called the base component and the other is called reactor or curing agent. Base is a polyol and the reactor is an isocyanide such as TDI or MDI. There are various grades of and so also there are numerous isocyanides. The combination of these two ingredients results in a formation liquid applied rigid membrane or a foam depending upon the selection.
 
In waterproofing, this rigid liquid membrane was tried with fibreglass reinforcing mats. The systems failed because coefficients of thermal expansion of concrete and rigid PU membrane being different lateral movement or creep occurred with the passage on one working climatic cycle. When exposed to ultra violet rays or direct sunlight most rigid membranes became brittle and crumbled.
 
Apart from this the application of coating needed very rigorous surface preparation. The surface needed to be neutralised by removing alkalinity from the concrete surface through acid itching then washing and blowtorching to make the surface bone dry. This kind of surface preparation with acids angered the civil engineering community and the product ceased to be used as material apart from its several failures. Never the less continuous research in the technology gave the construction industry excellent sealant for glazing industry and foams for thermal insulations. The new generation polyurethanes, which are alkali stable and water-based, may find better applications in industry.
 
based system
Like is also a two-component system having a base resin and a reactor or curing agent. Base resin is obtained by dissolving bis-phenol A flakes in epichlorohydrin. This base is available in various viscosity ranges to suit different application conditions. The curing agent is an amine/polyamine aliphatic or aromatic, or an amine-adduct for general applications and polyamide or an amino-amide for coating purposes. After mixing base and reactor components the resultant viscous liquid or paste if some fillers are added to it can be brush applied like a paint or trowel applied like a mortar.
 
Here also epoxies not withstanding the alkalinity of concrete and the concrete needs to be acid washed and neutralised, which the civil engineers hated. Here again the coefficient of thermal expansion of concrete and being different the compatibility of in exposed concrete surfaces such as roofs became limited. Later the use of in was discarded. But epoxies have come to stay in civil engineering industry as bonding agents, floor & wall coatings, coatings for food processing units, operation theatres and computer and pharmaceutical industries.
 
Box type waterproofing
This type of water proofing system is used only for basement or structures below the ground level from outside to prevent leakages of subsoil water into the basement.
 
In this method, limestone slabs (Shahabad Stones) are first laid in the excavated pit over blinding concrete in a staggered joint fashion to avoid the continuity of the mortar joints. The joints are effectively filled with rich mortar admixed with integral compound and cured. Over this the raft is laid and shear/brick walls constructed. The limestone slabs are erected around the walls in a similar fashion leaving a gap of one to two inches between the external surface of the wall and the inner face of the stone surface. The joints again effectively sealed with rich admixed mortar and the same mortar is filled in the gap between the wall and the stones. This stonework is continued up to ground level. In this system the raft and the sidewalls are protected from direct exposure to sub soil water.
 
This system works on two principles of common sense. First, the area exposed to subsoil water is only the area of the joint where as the whole stone is impervious to water, hence only a fraction of area, that is, that of the joint is exposed to subsoil water, when the joint itself is filled with rich and quality mortar. Second, the path of water to reach the raft or the sidewall is elongated. This elongated path is through quality mortar. This system seeks to delay the occurrence of leakages in the basements. A lot of building structures are waterproofed by this system. A few notable successes are to its credit especially in five star hotels and of-course there are a few failures as well.
 
(The second part of this series will discuss the modern techniques and their advantages)

 This post was taken from http://www.business-standard.com

6 tips to help you tackle damp problems in your home

Damp plaster is unpleasant to live with, especially at this time of year, and can affect the whole room, but what can you do about it?

Here are six tips for dealing with the problem:

1. Check the outside of your home. Penetrating damp happens when there's a problem with the fabric of the building. While the damp usually moves horizontally from the outside in, it can appear on ceilings (see below) as well as walls.

Defective or missing flashing on the roof, defective or blocked guttering, defective pointing and brickwork, and cracked or missing render typically cause penetrating damp, although there may be other causes. Sometimes what appears to be damp may actually be condensation.

2. If the lower part of a wall is damp, it's probably rising damp (water coming up from the ground), in which case the solution may be a new damp-proof course, installed by a specialist damp company (other damp-proofing solutions are available).

Once the bricks are damp, the moisture usually transfers to the plaster inside - tell-tale signs include dark patches and blistering/bubbling paint, but it's not always obvious that the plaster is damp. Damp plaster should be removed to expose the bricks underneath - letting them dry out is a good idea, but it can take a very long time.

3. If you can't wait, get a plasterer to do a waterproof render and then replaster, so there's a barrier between the moisture in the bricks and the new plaster. This is a messy process and if you get a specialist damp company to do it, it may be expensive, but they should provide a guarantee. Most plasterers won't give you a guarantee, but should charge a lot less.

The key is to get an experienced and reputable plasterer who knows what they're doing and uses the right products. If the waterproof render isn't done correctly, the damp will come back through the plaster, which is disastrous.

4. Sometimes the damp-proof course is simply being prevented from doing its job. You should be able to see it along your home's exterior walls - look for a row of small holes a little way up from the ground.

In old properties, slate was used as the original damp-proof course and is sometimes still in place. If the level of your garden, patio or path is higher than the damp-proof course, for example, it won't work properly.

5. Perhaps you've noticed damp on a chimney breast, or where the chimney breast would have originally been? This could be because the chimney stack needs repairs, the chimney pot isn't capped, or the chimney breast isn't ventilated properly indoors.

When a fireplace opening is sealed up, a vent should be fitted, but isn't always (it's a relatively straightforward DIY job to fit one), and vents can get blocked with dust and debris. A defective chimney or roof can cause damp on the ceilings below, especially if there's no roofing felt, which is sometimes the case in old properties.

6. The quickest and easiest DIY way to deal with damp plaster is to cover it with anti-damp paint and then repaint the topcoat. Anti-damp paint is usually really thick, so apply it with a brush (to get lots on) and then use a mini foam roller to get a good, flat finish. Leave it to dry thoroughly - see the manufacturer's instructions - and apply a second coat if recommended.

Anti-damp paint works well for a while, but is rarely able to hold back damp long term.

Our RapidGuard product will prevent moisture from penetrating the surface. Read more here.

This post was taken from www.newsshopper.co.uk

How are roofing costs estimated?

General Tips

The roof is one of the biggest investments you'll make in your home. Find out how the costs of installation of a new roof and repairs on existing roofs are determined.

Size: Roofers will calculate the exact size and dimensions of your roof to best estimate the amount of materials needed.

Slope of your roof: The steeper your roof is, the more materials will be needed to cover it.

Materials: The price for materials will depend on what kind of roofing materials you choose to have installed.

Roof access: If your roof is difficult to access, or if it is multiple stories, contractors may charge more.

Difficulty level: If your project is complex - for example, if you have chimneys, skylights and vents that roofers need to work around - the higher the cost could be.

Location: Where you live could determine your estimate.

See this article here & credit goes to http://www.news8000.com/lifestyle/how-are-roofing-costs-estimated/221573408

local.which.co.uk contacted Which? Local-recommended traders to find out how much standard jobs should cost and how quickly they should be completed. Armed with this information, you’ll feel confident about hiring traders and be better equipped to spot when things aren't right.

local.which.co.uk surveyed recommended roofers to find out how much you should spend on 13 common jobs and how long they should take to complete.

How are roofing costs estimated? How are roofing costs estimated? roof 1197886 1920

Trader tip: scaffolding

If extensive work is taking place on a property above one storey high then it’s likely that scaffolding will be required.

Scaffolding is expensive, and takes hours to put up and take down. This will increase the price of quotes.

Research methodology

In July 2012, we sent a survey to all Which? Local traders in the Roofers category with a rating of three stars or more and an email address.

20 roofing professionals responded to the survey. Using their experience and expertise, they answered questions about the cost of popular roofing jobs, and how long they should take to complete.

Job Details Typical price quoted Price range Typical time to complete job
Survey conducted in July 2012
Replace fascias and soffits on a typical three-bed detached bungalow Remove wooden fascias and soffits. Replace with uVPC. Includes cost of labour and materials. Assuming no scaffolding needed. £1,900 £1,250-£2,225 2–5 days
Replace fascias and soffits on a typical three-bed detached, two-storey house Remove wooden fascias and soffits. Replace with uVPC. Includes cost of labour, materials and scaffolding. £2,425 £1,625-£3,000 2–5 days
Replace lead flashing on chimney n/a £340 £300-£450 1 day
Fix leaking roof on a two-bed bungalow Replace approx six roof tiles. n/a £80-£189 1-3 hours
Fix leaking roof on three-bed, semi-detached, two storey house Replace approx six roof tiles. n/a £88-£200 1–3 hours
Replace whole roof on a two-bed bungalow – plain tiles Remove existing tiles, fit new plain tiles. Includes cost of labour, materials and scaffolding. £4,500 £3,850-£5,875 4-6 days
Replace whole roof on a three-bed, semi-detached, two-storey house – plain tiles Remove existing tiles, fit new plain tiles. Includes cost of labour and materials. £5,600 £4,500-£7,000 6–10 days
Replace whole roof on a four-bed, detached, two-storey house – plain tiles Remove existing tiles, fit new plain tiles. Includes cost of labour and materials. £6,750 £5,500-£8,750 10–14 days
Replace whole roof on a two-bed bungalow - slate Remove existing slate and replace with new. £4,800 £4,000-£6,000 5–10 days
Replace whole roof on a three-bed, semi-detached, two-storey house – slate Remove existing slate and replace with new. £6,250 £5,000-£7,500 8–12 days
Replace whole roof on a four-bed, detached, two-storey house – slate Remove existing slate and replace with new. £8,250 £6,500-£12,000 10–20 days
Flat roof on typical single garage Put a flat roof on existing single garage - rubber membrane. £900 £840-£1,150 1 day
Flat roof on conservatory Put a flat roof on a conservatory measuring approx 10'10” x      

This has been taken from https://local.which.co.uk/advice/cost-price-information-roofers-roofing-jobs

Tips on preparing your roof for winter

Tips on preparing your roof for winter

INSPECT THE ROOF

Some people love the sound of rain, but nobody likes the drip, drip, drip of a leaky roof. So start your fall home inspection from the top, taking a good look at the condition of your roof. Curled, damaged, loose or missing shingles are signs that your roof may be compromised.

"Problems can arise anywhere on the roof, but more often than not, the best areas to check are generally where shingles meet any wall, chimney, skylight, pipe or other flashings," said Jeff Durocher, of Jeff Durocher Roofing in Little Falls.

A loose shingle doesn’t seem like much cause for concern, but it can lead to bigger problems. As Durocher noted, "if it blows off, becomes damaged in a storm or if there is a few feet of snow on the roof, the result can be a serious leak.Sometimes problems won’t be seen until expensive interior damage is already done. This makes what would have typically been a simple maintenance repair job much more invasive, requiring tearing up an area of roofing and removing and replacing rotted wood from scratch."

Before climbing a ladder to check out the conditions on the roof yourself, however, consider that a thorough inspection should really be left to a pro. "Some people may be tempted, but if your shingles are sliding out of place in one area, who is to say others won’t slide out from under your feet when you’re attempting a repair," cautioned Durocher. "Plus sometimes what looks like a small problem, can really be much worse. A professional may notice things that a homeowner cannot."

Although he doesn’t recommend leaving a roof inspection to a do-it-yourselfer, Durocher said you can also check inside your home for telltale signs of trouble. He recommends examining the ceiling for stains. Water stains usually have a dark ring around them and get larger and darker after it rains. Take particular note of what Durocher called "flashing regions," the walls and ceiling around skylights or chimneys.

DODGE THE DRAFT

Here’s one way to keep your heating bills low: seal leaks due to cracks around your home’s windows and doors. Weather stripping is an inexpensive solution, but it can deter-iorate, so check it and replace it if necessary.

Caulk is another easy remedy for drafty gaps not only around doors and windows, but for places on an exterior wall where cable, phone, electrical or gas lines enter the house. If there is existing caulk, make sure it isn’t cracked or damaged. If it is, scrape off the old stuff and re-caulk.

Test for drafts in all of these areas on a windy day now, and take appropriate measures before the temperature drops to freezing.

CHECK STAIRS, WALKWAYS, DRIVEWAYS

Chipped stairs and loose railings spell potential disaster, as do damaged walkways and driveways. And the danger is exacerbated when conditions outdoors are slippery and icy. Minor repairs to concrete surfaces are easy, however.

Clean out the crack thoroughly, using a wire brush. Then apply a concrete repair caulk or crack filler, which you can find in any home improvement or hardware store. You can also find patch kits for driveways, working the same way. But leave major repairs to large cracks, stairs and other concrete surfaces to a professional.

Finally, a few last words to the wise from Durocher, "A homeowner should look at their property before the bad winter weather comes and always look as often as possible. There may be problems a professional contractor can correct with simple standard maintenance. Being proactive with your property will go a long way in making sure your home is prepared for the most crucial months of the year."

This was taken from blog post http://archive.northjersey.com/

Tips on preparing your roof for winter Tips on preparing your roof for winter snow 941411 1920

CLEAN THE GUTTERS

Right now falling leaves, twigs and other wind-blown debris are not just covering your lawn, they are clogging your gutters and drain spouts. Cleaning the gutters is a minor task but it’s of major importance.

Said Tom Stachelrodt of North Jersey Gutter Topper in Ridgewood, "Clogged gutters in the winter prevent rain and melting snow from flowing away from your house, causing snow and ice buildup on your roof and gutters. This extra weight can result in gutters that pull away from or fall off the house. It also causes ice damming, which is a buildup of melting snow and ice that can [leak into] your home."

Clean, unobstructed gutters, on the other hand, head off potential water damage to the roof and also to siding and even your home’s foundation.

Cleaning the gutters yourself is relatively easy. You’ll need a trowel, or work gloves, to scoop out twigs, leaves, dirt or any other bits of things — including insects and other critters that may be nesting in there.

You’ll also need a sturdy ladder. Never stand on the roof and lean over to do the job. That’s dangerous.

Once you’ve cleaned out everything, flush the gutters with water, using a garden hose. Then make sure the downspouts are clear and nothing is lodging inside them.

However, Stachelrodt cautioned, "Cleaning your gutters once or twice a year does not guarantee clean gutters. You should clean them at least six times a year to ensure the flow of water away from the house."

You might consider installing gutter screens or gutter guards. A gutter guard is a product made of aluminum or super-fine mesh screening or perforated metal that goes over the existing gutter or it can be a heavy-duty brush that sits inside the gutter to prevent clogs [resulting] from the buildup of leaves and other debris.

Roof Protection 6 tips

6 Guided Tips For Roof Protection and Repair Tips

What indicates holes in flashing?

Holes in Flashing

Rainwater will penetrate wherever there's an opening, and there are a lot more than the average person realizes. Check out the underside of the roof for wetness or mold around points of penetration (plumbing vents, chimneys), wherever different roof planes intersect (valleys) and near dormers. *These are signs you've got holes in your flashing or that the flashing was installed wrong.

Flashing refers to thin pieces of impervious material installed to prevent the passage of water into a structure from a joint or as part of a weather resistant barrier (WRB) system.

 

How can I tell if my roofing material is defective?

Once rainwater breaks into your house, it can be very elusive. You may not find water directly below a penetration point. Keep in mind that water may travel sideways before passing through a joint in the roof sheathing, and may travel in a horizontal joint before falling on the floor or ceiling. If this happens, there may be a problem in the roofing material.

 

How much water does a roof collect in a 2 inch rainfall?

Of Roofs and Rainfall

One very obvious source of moisture and/or water in your basement is rainwater. During a hard 2 "- rainfall, a 1,000-square-foot roof will collect about 250 gallons of water, dying to get into you nice dry basement. If you have four downspouts, that averages out to about 63 gallons (240 l) per downspout location. Check your roof thoroughly for leaks and repair them as soon as possible. The longer you let the problem occur, the worse the damage will be.

 

What are the most common sources of a leaky roof?

Common Sources of Roof Leaks

Every time it rains, your roof is under attack from liquid invaders from the sky, seeking to breech your home's defenses and steal your right to be warm and dry (well, that's one way of looking at it). Rainwater is quick to exploit any weakness in the integrity of your roofing defense system. Roofing materials can wear out, break, rust, blow off, or otherwise fail and give moisture the opening it needs to do its damage. Most commonly rainwater finds its way through the roof by way of a chimney, plumbing vent, exhaust fan or skylight, flashings when the sealant joints around these penetrations crack and fail. Look for potential chinks in your home's armor in the following areas:

  • Old or defective shingles can curl and crack, allowing moisture intrusion. If old shingles aren't removed before new roof shingles are applied, it can reduce the life of the new roof. 
    • Chimney caps can crack allowing water inside the chimney. 
    • Gutter flashing can fail, forcing rainwater to set up camp between the roof and gutter. 
    • Flat or low pitched roofs have unique maintenance needs and are susceptible to water problems because they may not drain as quickly as roofs with a steeper pitch.

Flat roof drains or scuppers can clog and hold water on the roof, increasing the risk, not only of a leak, but of a possible collapse of the entire roof under the weight of the water. The price of dryness is eternal vigilance. Keep possible penetration points well sealed and maintained and you will have nothing to fear from raindrops falling on your roof. You don't need a guide to roof protection and repair to know that prevention is your best defense.

Where do I start looking for a leak.

 

Locating a Roof Leak

When it comes to leaking roofs, many homeowners are looking for leaks in all the wrong places. You no longer have to be one of them. The first and perhaps most obvious place to look for a roof leak is directly above the leak in a ceiling or exterior wall. Use a flashlight to inspect the attic floor over the leak while it's raining. If you see standing water, water stains, mold, wet insulation or other exposed insulation, you've found what you've been looking for.

What do I do about a leaky roof?

 

Preventing Roof Leak Damage

A leaky roof can be a pain forever, if not taken care of promptly. As soon as you spot water coming in, stains, or mold, take immediate action to limit damage. Hire a professional to nip it in the bud or go to the library and pick up a guide to roof protection and repair so you can handle it yourself. Locate the leak from inside and then take steps to control the damage until you can have a suitable outside inspection and repair done. Remember, your leaky roof won't get better with age and won't repair itself.

Written by: LifeTips link to blog post below.

Life Tips