Can Reflective Roofing Save Energy and Help the Environment?

Can Reflective Roofing Save Energy and Help the Environment?

By Bob Schildgen

Hey Mr. Green,

I liked your article about the amount of space needed to provide solar power in the United States. I have wondered how many roofs would have to be painted white to replace the albedo of the melting ice caps. We live in Houston, Texas, and I’ve often thought of painting ours white to reduce our AC bill.

— Dianne, in Houston

Painting rooftops white may have some promise, although there remains considerable debate about its benefits, especially given that the soot in our air has the potential to trap their reflected heat.

There are several other factors to also consider. The cooling effects of the white roof could, for example, force folks to turn the furnace up in winter, thereby offsetting at least some of its benefit. As the EPA politely and rather cautiously reminds us: “Please remember the energy savings that can be achieved with reflective roofing is highly dependent on facility design, insulation used, climatic conditions, building location, and building envelope efficiency.”

If you’d like to dig deeper into the issue and come up with a specific calculation for your location and type of dwelling, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory offers a Cool Roof Calculator. Based on evidence I’ve seen, the benefits of the white roof would probably be greater in your area than in cities farther north. Good luck with your research!

Three tips for a great new roof

Three tips for a great new roof

Most houses in Canada have asphalt shingle roofs, and June is an excellent month to have new shingles installed. With hot weather on the way, shingles will seal down reliably later on in the summer sun. But June itself is also not usually so hot that the shingles will be soft and easily damaged underfoot during installation.

TaniaVdB / Pixabay

If you’re interested in getting the best possible asphalt shingle roofing job, there are details you need to discuss with your roofer. As with any other professional in life, don’t assume all roofers necessarily use the best possible techniques. Be your own watchdog by asking about the re-roofing details here and you’ll get the best possible results.

There are three parts to any great asphalt shingling job — the shingles themselves, the underlay system and the roof vents that round out any good installation.

Improved tar, gravel and substrates have boosted potential shingle lifespan enough that 40- and 50-year shingle warranties are now common. Thirty years ago shingles were sold with 10-, 15- and sometimes 20-year warranties at the top end. These days all manufacturers have doubled these numbers, and the difference is about more than just marketing.

The “10-year” shingles on the left lasted for 30 years before needing to be replaced. Thefibreglass shingles, right, have a rated lifespan of 40 years. (STEVE MAXWELL)

Most of the gain in shingle life comes from the use of fibreglass as a shingle substrate instead of the more traditional organic felt. Fibreglass shingles look the same as organic ones on your roof because they’re impregnated with the same kind of tar and gravel used as part of all asphalt shingles. That said, fibreglass is much more resistant to heat than felt, and this makes all the difference. Even on very hot, unventilated roof surfaces, fibreglass shingles consistently deliver their expected lifespan without curling. You also get a higher fire rating with fibreglass. In addition, fibreglass shingles are about 30 per cent thinner than organics for a given quality of shingle, making them easier to install on ridges, as part of woven valleys or any other application where bending of some shingles is required.

Ventilation is another critical roof issue. Most roofs need more of it than they have for two reasons — first, more ventilation reduces attic temperatures during summer, making it easier to keep upper floors cool, and second, attic ventilation allows internal moisture from domestic activities like washing, showering and breathing to vent away freely in winter, in case this moisture happens to enter the attic incidentally. You can’t have too much attic ventilation, and there’s no better time to install more vents than during a reroofing job. Ridge vents deliver the most ventilation for the least amount of visual distraction.

The best roof installations are waterproof before shingles go on, and this means more than just a layer of that old-fashioned, 15-pound tarpaper nailed to roof sheathing. There are two philosophies behind creating a reliable secondary layer of protection underneath your shingles, and they’re completely different.

The black fabric being installed here keeps water out if the shingles fail, but also allows watervapour to escape if necessary. (STEVE MAXWELL)

When self-sticking ice and water shield arrived on the scene about 25 years ago, it didn’t take long for it to replace tarpaper as a complete roof underlay on high-end installations. And this approach still makes a lot of sense, except for one universal Canadian issue.

Cold climates create a moisture threat that can attack roof structures from both top and bottom. In addition to the usual hazard of water leaking from above, there’s also the possibility of moisture condensing in parts of the roof structure from below during winter. This is why the best roof underlay these days is breathable. It combines the ability to shed water along with the ability to dry out from the inside.

Ask any prospective roofers for homeowner references, check them out, then go with a contractor who has a track record of good work and is willing to use today’s best shingling methods.

Global Roofing Chemicals Market – Increasing Need for Thermal Management in Buildings to Drive Growth| Technavio

Mediamodifier / Pixabay

Global Roofing Chemicals Market – Increasing Need for Thermal Management in Buildings to Drive Growth| Technavio

A major trend being observed in the market is the rising development of bio-based roofing chemicals. With the increasing concerns about toxic effects of synthetic chemical-based roofing products on the environment and humans, the need for developing bio-based and sustainable roofing products is rising at a high rate. Many consumers across the globe are looking for greener, bio-based or natural chemistries to replace petrochemical-based products.

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In this report, Technavio analysts highlight the growing need for thermal management in buildings as a key factor contributing to the growth of the global roofing chemicals market:

Growing need for thermal management in buildings

With the rising sustainable living standards and growing middle-class population, the need for reducing the carbon footprint of houses has increased. This has fueled the demand for roofing chemicals. Roofing chemicals are highly efficient for the thermal management of buildings. These chemicals provide high reflectivity properties to the roofs, thereby lowering the temperature of the houses.

According to a senior analyst at Technavio for construction, “The use of roofing chemicals on the rooftops reduces the energy consumption by keeping the temperature low and results in reduced carbon emissions. Reflective roof chemicals shield the roofing materials from UV light also. Roofing chemicals can extend the lifespan of roofs, reduce the cooling energy costs by 20% to 70%, and can also reduce air pollution. The necessity for cool non-white coatings arose as dark colors absorb more heat and are also aesthetically appealing.”

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Roofing chemicals – market segmentation

This market research report segments the global roofing chemicals market into the following products (asphalt/bituminous, acrylic resin, epoxy resin, and elastomer) and key regions (the Americas, APAC, and EMEA). It provides an in-depth analysis of the prominent factors influencing the market, including drivers, opportunities, trends, and industry-specific challenges.

Of the four major products, the asphalt/bituminous segment held the largest market share in 2017, accounting for nearly 41% of the market. The market share of this segment is expected to increase by almost 1% during the forecast period.

APAC dominated the global roofing chemicals market in 2017, accounting for a market share of around 40%. This region is anticipated to post the fastest growth during the forecast period.

This post was taken from https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20180524006202/en/Global-Roofing-Chemicals-Market—Increasing-Thermal

Roofing’s finest celebrate at NFRC’s UK Roofing Awards 2018

Home - Industry News - Roofing’s finest celebrate at NFRC’s UK Roofing Awards 2018

Roofing’s finest celebrate at NFRC’s UK Roofing Awards 2018

Building Product’s Sophie Stevens reports

Essex-based Full Metal Jacket scooped three awards, including Roof of the Year, for its work on this derelict, former Grade II listed concert hall on Ramsgate seafront. It has been renovated with a striking zinc roof to reportedly become the UK’s largest Weatherspoon’s pub.

Essex-based Full Metal Jacket scooped three awards, including Roof of the Year, for its work on this derelict, former Grade II listed concert hall on Ramsgate seafront. It has been renovated with a striking zinc roof to reportedly become the UK’s largest Weatherspoon’s pub.

Essex-based installer, Full Metal Jacket, has scooped the coveted Roof of the Year award at the UK Roofing Awards 2018, for its work on Ramsgate’s Royal Victoria Pavilion. The company also bagged a further two awards, making it a hat-trick for the zinc, copper, lead and stainless-steel specialist.

Close to 800 people descended on London’s Park Plaza Westminster Bridge hotel to celebrate the great and the good of the UK roofing industry at an awards presentation ceremony and dinner, organised by the National Federation of Roofing Contractors (NFRC) and hosted by BBC sports and breakfast presenter, Dan Walker.

Opening the event, which is now in its 11th year, the NFRC’s chief executive, James Talman, paid tribute to “the important contribution” the roofing sector makes to the construction industry, through “innovative products, design and workmanship”, commending the high standards and “commitment to quality”demonstrated by this year’s finalists.

The competition covers the full spectrum of roofing disciplines, with winners chosen by a panel of experts, based on criteria including difficulty, aesthetics, problem solving, workmanship and environmental consideration. Five new categories added for 2018 included the Local Hero award, in recognition of ‘those individuals who go above and beyond to support their community’ and the Industry Choice award, which was decided by a public vote.

Triple winner, Full Metal Jacket, said on Twitter: “What a day for FMJ! It’s the foundations that are important, so we appreciate our great guys that install, together with the surveyors and all the office staff that make these awards possible.”

A total of £7,500 was also raised during the proceedings for charity partner, Parkinson’s UK, following a captivating speech by representative, Emma Lawton, which was met with a standing ovation.

The winners were:

Roof Slating
Claude N Smith for Marshals Yard Development

Roof Tiling (Sponsored by ECIC)
Monier Redland working with DM Roofing & Roughcasting for Shettleston New Parish Church

Heritage Roofing (Sponsored by Klober)
Rowlands Roofing for LLwyn Celyn

Green Roofing
Bauder working with EJ Roberts Roofing for Clapham Park

Sheeting and Cladding/Rainscreen
Malone Roofing (Newbury) for Hungerford Fire Station

Fully Supported Metal (Sponsored by Metal Solutions)
Full Metal Jacket for The Victoria Royal Pavilion

Lead Roofing (Sponsored by Chandlers Roofing Supplies)
Full Metal Jacket for British Museum – Islamic Gallery

Single Ply
Ithaca Roofing for Hawthorns Care Home

Liquid Applied Roofing & Waterproofing and Hot Melt
Polyroof working with Sarnian Roofing for The Little Chapel

Innovation (Sponsored by EagleView)
Axter working with Tilbury Contracts for Dylon Works

Mastic Asphalt
IKO working with Sussex Asphalte for St Paul’s Cathedral

Reinforced Bitumen Membrane
Langley Waterproofing Systems working with Opus Waterproofing Solutions for Girdlestone Estate

Small Scale Project
Polyroof working with Cure Roofing for Rose Cottage

Large Scale Project (Sponsored by Wienerberger)
Partnering Contractor’s Roofing for New Bracken House

Roof of the Year Award (Sponsored by SIG Roofing)
Full Metal Jacket for The Victoria Royal Pavilion

Industry Choice Award (Sponsored by Radmat Building Products)
Longworth Building Services for The Bund

NFRC Health & Safety Champion Award 2018
Sam Baldwin, Longworth Building Services

Local Hero Award (Sponsored by SIG Roofing)
Lee Moran, Moran Roofing Specialists

Further information about this year’s winners and finalists can be found at www.roofingawards.co.uk

 

Entry for the UK Roofing Awards 2019 will open in September 2018.

Recycled roofing tiles get a second life as stunning wall tiles with the Parkway collection

Recycled roofing tiles get a second life as stunning wall tiles with the Parkway collection

MINNEAPOLIS, April 30, 2018 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The Parkway collection, made of recycled roofing tiles, joins hundreds of other new and unique tiles being introduced this season at The Tile Shop (NASDAQ:TTS), a specialty retailer of natural stone and man-made tiles.

annca / Pixabay

The two tiles in the Parkway collection, a chevron mosaic tile and a subway tile, are made of authentic recycled clay roofing tiles. The steel-grey, blue and sandy-brown tones visible in these tiles create an entirely original look that is a blend of cool and warm colors on the walls of the home. As more and more tiles function as works of art, the Parkway series, from The Tile Shop’s proprietary brand Fired Earth Ceramics, is one of the most interesting and stunning tiles to serve this purpose.

The Parkway collection is another addition to the assortment of unique tiles that satisfy consumer demand for original and hard-to-find tiles. “A lot of people these days say they want products that are different and have a unique story,” said Kevin McDaniel, vice president of merchandising at The Tile Shop. “With the Parkway collection, each tile is original and one of a kind.”

This collection is one of dozens of new and unique products being released this month and represent part of a commitment by The Tile Shop to offer the leading assortment in the industry.

For more information, please visit www.tileshop.com.

About The Tile Shop

The Tile Shop (NASDAQ:TTS) is a leading specialty retailer of natural stone and man-made tiles, setting and maintenance materials and related accessories in the United States. The Company offers a wide selection of high-quality products, exclusive designs, knowledgeable staff and exceptional customer service in an extensive showroom environment with up to 50 full-room tiled displays which are enhanced by the complimentary Design Studio, a collaborative platform to create customized 3-D design renderings to scale, allowing customers to bring their design ideas to life. The Tile Shop currently operates 140 stores in 31 states and the District of Columbia, with an average size of 20,200 square feet and sells products online at www.tileshop.com.

The Tile Shop is a proud member of the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID), National Association of Homebuilders (NAHB), National Kitchen and Bath Association (NKBA) and the National Tile Contractors Association (NTCA). Visit www.tileshop.com. Join The Tile Shop (#thetileshop) on Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest and Twitter.

 

This post was taken from https://globenewswire.com/news-release/2018/04/30/1490206/0/en/Recycled-roofing-tiles-get-a-second-life-as-stunning-wall-tiles-with-the-Parkway-collection.html

Northampton mum-to-be ‘scared’ after being moved to hotel following asbestos fear in flat roof

An expectant mum from Northampton is saying enough is enough to her housing association after, she claims, asbestos has been found in her roof.

QuinceMedia / Pixabay

Jade Fuller, 25, of Billing Road has been living in her property for nine years. But on Friday, after builders arrived to fix a leaky bedroom light, which has been dripping since April 1, she says she discovered her property had been insulated with asbestos.

But upon voicing her concerns about the potentially deadly substance, Jade says no-one has been out to see her since.

She said: “I rang them Friday – I said ‘what’s going on about the roof?’ And they said ‘we believe there’s asbestos in the roof, we can’t send anyone out until we’ve had it checked.

“They put me in a hotel from Friday until Tuesday, just gone, and they’ve still not made it safe.”

While she was away – the mum-to-be was at least expecting her leaky bedroom light to be fixed and for the asbestos to be cleared – but she says nothing has changed.

“They’ve done nothing and I’m just made to come back here,” she added.

Jade, who is six weeks pregnant, is calling on Orbit to move her to a safer property for her and her soon-to-be infant.

“It’s scary because I’m pregnant as well now, it’s not great. I don’t want to be here – I don’t want to live here at all – it’s not a nice place to live.

“I want to move really. I’ve asked them for an urgent transfer, or anything, and they’re saying ‘I don’t think we can do that’.

“But I’m just supposed to be left in a property that’s unsafe?”

Jade’s living room also has mould on the ceiling and around the windows.

“I suffer with depression and anxiety, mainly since I’ve been living here.”

Neil Yeomans, head of property compliance at Orbit said: “We want all of our customers to live in homes that are secure and comfortable, and we apologise to Miss Fuller for the inconvenience this has caused.

“However, we wanted to make absolutely sure that her home is safe and can confirm that at no time were Miss Fuller and her partner in any danger of breathing in asbestos fibres.

“We temporarily relocated her and her partner as a precautionary measure.

A surveyor attended her home again yesterday (Wednesday) to confirm exactly what was needed to complete the roof repair, which Orbit say they plan to carry out as soon as possible.

How to choose a quality roofing contractor

How to choose a quality roofing contractor

nstalling a new roof is one of the most important — and expensive — home improvement projects you’ll run into as a homeowner. Considering this, and the fact that your roof is your first line of defense against the elements, it’s important you hire a qualified, licensed professional for your roofing repair and installation

geralt / Pixabay

projects. There are a number of roofing companies to choose from, so it helps to follow a few basic rules to ensure that you find, choose and hire the best professional for the job.

 

TALK TO SEVERAL CONTRACTORS

Talking to several roofing companies will help you identify an honest and reasonable price range. You probably don’t want to hinge your final hiring decision on the difference of a few hundred dollars for a project that costs several thousand dollars, but you should be wary of any remarkably low or excessively high bids. Of course, this will also provide you the opportunity to gauge your level of rapport with each contractor as you work your way through the rest of the rules for hiring a qualified roofing professional.

 

RESEARCH CREDENTIALS

It’s also important to perform research on the different companies you’re speaking with — particularly those who stand out after your initial conversations. Reputable contractors should be licensed and willing to provide you with at least three references verifying the quality of their work. Confirming that a contractor is licensed — and speaking with past customers who can verify their credibility and qualifications — will give you added peace of mind.

REVIEW THE CONTRACT AND WARRANTIES CLOSELY

Never sign a contract without reading it over carefully. Professional contractors won’t be annoyed with your taking the time to understand the terms of your agreement — and most will be happy to sit down with you and explain parts you don’t understand. Also, make sure you understand the warranty that comes with your new roof. All materials and workmanship should be guaranteed for at least five years, and the roofing itself ought to come with a 20- to 40-year warranty.

COVER YOUR BASES

Before work begins, be sure to cover your bases. Check with your contractor about whether you need to acquire a permit (most roofing companies will take care of this as part of their service), and confirm that their employees are covered by workers comp as well. Finally, if you’re submitting an insurance claim on your roof, make certain you’ve followed all the necessary procedures — and undergone all the necessary approvals — before work on your new roof begins.

NEVER PAY THE ENTIRE BALANCE UPFRONT

Never pay the entire balance of your new roof up front. This goes for all large projects. If your contractor asks this of you, terminate your relationship and be sure not to sign a contract. Asking for a reasonable deposit and a payment schedule that parallels the work is common practice. In no case should you ever pay with cash. Using a credit card increases the likelihood that, in a worst-case scenario, you’ll be able to recover your money without expensive litigation.

———

This post was taken from http://www.heraldcourier.com/community/how-to-choose-a-quality-roofing-contractor/article_9d44db7c-bf1b-53d5-a85e-29b438581692.html

Elastomeric Membrane Market Dynamics, Forecast, Analysis and Supply Demand -2025

Elastomeric membrane is a waterproof roofing material that can withstand high temperatures and ensure excellent durability of the roofing material. It is highly

rawpixel / Pixabay

recommended in the regions where extreme climatic conditions prevail. The lifespan of elastomeric membrane about 25 to 30 years. Properties such as durability and moisture resistance makes elastomeric membrane an ideal choice for roofs. These membranes are used on large flat and low-slope roofs and require minimum maintenance. Its excellent property of elasticity makes it apparent for cold climate. Elastomeric membranes are slightly more expensive than conventional roofing materials. However, the long shelf-life of these membranes justifies their price. The commercial industry witnesses the widespread usage of elastomeric membranes as the focus of the end-user in the industry lies more in the durability of the product. Elastomeric membranesare utilized on roofs, walls, underground construction areas, and in wet areas.

There are two types of elastomeric membranes, – namely, dual-layered traditional membrane and self-adhesive elastomeric membrane. Traditional elastomeric membranes comprise two layers, namely, the base layer and a top finishing layer. The top finishing layer consists of granules that make it resistant to harsh environmental conditions. A blow torch is used to install the top layer. Self-adhesive elastomeric membranes are easy to install, as they are cold-applied on the flat or low-sloped roof. In this case, there is a film which covers the adhesive. During installation, this film has to be removed as the strips of self-adhesive elastomeric membrane are unrolled. Suppliers of elastomeric membranes are focusing on product development in order to meet the highly-competitive fragmented market. Recently, the U.S-based company, KARNAK, launched K-NRG Seal VP’s seamless seal for elastomeric membrane, which seals the building envelope by inhibiting the passage of air. This product helps attain superior energy-efficiency mandated by the governing agencies.

Increasing market for infrastructure and strict environmental norms and regulations are key factors driving the elastomeric membrane market. Government regulations mandates certain standards and waterproofing materials to be followed in major parts of the world. For instance, the U.S Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) program called ’ENERGY STAR® Program Requirements for Roof Products’. Elastomeric roof coatings meets the guidelines set by the EPA for energy-efficiency defined by the United States Green Building Council. Some countries in Europe follow the roofing standards set by ASTM that mandates required properties and testing procedures for high-solids content and cold liquid-applied elastomeric membranes. These standards play a vital role in prompting consumers to prefer elastomeric membranes. Increasing investments in the commercial construction sector of emerging countries such as India, Indonesia, etc., is expected to boost the elastomeric membrane market.

North America accounts for a major share of the elastomeric membrane market influenced by regulations and norms for pollution control enacted by the U.S government. The non-residential sector in the region is witnessing significant expansion due to increasing industrial development in the U.S and Canada, which is contributing to the institutional construction. This investment is expected to increase further due to the rebuilding efforts undertaken by the U.S government to overcome the devastation caused by hurricanes. In a way, economy experts in the U.S. anticipate the construction spending to rise in the near future. North America is followed by Europe, which is also under the pressure of government’s policy for energy-efficient buildings. The real estate and infrastructure industry in the Middle East, primarily Saudi Arabia and the UAE, is expected to attract hefty investments. Asia Pacific, presently, occupies a minor share in the global elastomeric membrane market. However, the share of Asia Pacific is expected to increase in the near future due to rising urbanization and increasing awareness towards energy-efficient buildings.

Key manufacturers operating in the global elastomeric membrane market include Soprema Inc, BASF SE, Saint-Gobain S.A, KEMPER SYSTEM, Johns Manville, Sika AG, Carlisle Companies Inc, Firestone Building Products, and KARNAK.

This post was taken from https://realfacts24.com/14278/elastomeric-membrane-market-dynamics-forecast-analysis-and-supply-demand-2025/

Roof Maintenance

A residential property could have triple-reinforced titanium steel walls, and it still wouldn’t be worth a darn without a sturdy roof. It’s through the roof and rooftop features that many problematic elements can enter a building

jarmoluk / Pixabay

, from wind to rain to ice to debris. And because of that, the roof must be adequately fortified and properly maintained. Otherwise, the integrity of the building – along with resident safety and property value – are bound to suffer.

Basics for Beginners

Roofs are not just complicated, relatively delicate structures—they’re also harder to keep tabs on than a facade, or windows that people look at all day. Fortunately, there are myriad experts – from property managers to A/E/C professionals to trades persons who work solely on roofs – who can do the job for your building and keep your roof in good repair.

“A roof should be inspected every few years,” says Frank Sausa, Vice President of Altura Construction Company, Inc., in Garfield, New Jersey. “If a leak gets severe enough, a homeowner’s ceiling can literally collapse. The most common cause of leaks that we see is when the rubber boot around plumbing vents deteriorates. Additionally, we often conduct repairs around chimneys, skylights and valleys, utilizing shingles, leak barrier ice and water shield, synthetic paper, step flashing, counter flashing, and, most importantly, kick-out flashings.”

Between formal inspections by a roofing professional, associations should be doing routine maintenance on their own. “Inspection of roofs should be part of the basic building maintenance, and reviewed at a minimum of a few times per month, especially during and after heavy rains or snow,” says Dennis DePaola, Executive Vice President of Orsid Realty Corp., in New York City. “Not only should the roofing surface, pitch pockets, and flashings be checked, but the floor below should be looked at as well, in order to catch even the smallest amount of water infiltration as early as possible, before any major damage occurs.”

Of course, roofs are not ‘one size fits all,’ and a maintenance schedule therefore depends on the make and age of one’s model, as well as the weather to which it’s subjected. “Appropriate frequency of inspections of a roof may depend on its age, but annually is probably a general minimum,” recommends Christopher R. Berg, President of Independent Association Managers, Inc., in Naperville, Illinois. “Severe weather conditions may necessitate specific inspections, particularly for shingled roofs. If you can see the roof from the ground, loose or missing shingles can be spotted by the board or management on a simple walk. However, many problems would only be identified via closer inspection. For example, an examination of the attic may identify leaks and problems that wouldn’t be apparent elsewhere, such as insufficiently ventilated bathroom moisture or dryer lint.”

In areas like New England, where the weather in a given year can reach sweltering highs and frigid lows, roofs can wear much faster than in more temperate regions. To be proactive, an association should perform a visual inspection of its roof on an annual basis,” suggests Tim Arel, Owner and Principal at North Point Management, which has offices in both Massachusetts and New Hampshire. “This inspection should look for missing or damaged shingles, as well as wear and warping. That will allow an association to perform the small and relatively easy repairs before they develop into serious issues that result in the need for full roof replacement, or damage to the buildings. Proactive annual inspections work to extend the life span of the roof, but they also provide information needed to plan for a roof’s eventual replacement. And they can initially be performed by qualified members of the management team, or by association volunteers. The key is to have individuals who know what they’re looking for perform these inspections. Then, when issues are identified, management and the board should contact a qualified roofing contractor to perform the needed repairs, or to provide a professional assessment with recommendations.”

Damage Done

Certain roof-based dilemmas are more common than others, so it pays for a board or management to be aware of the likely suspects.

“We’ve taken over buildings from other firms wherein we have found severe structural steel damage due to neglect, and the failure to stop water infiltration for prolonged periods of time,” notes DePaola. “In such instances, we’ve had to install shoring within apartments to offset the load from the damaged steel. That may require a relocation of the residents, depending on the severity of the situation.

“We’ve also been successful in spotting smaller repairs of roofing systems that are still under warranty, at little-to-no expense to the building owner,” he continues. “By regularly checking for these smaller repairs and addressing them in a timely manner, owners can greatly extend the useful life of the roofing system, sometimes well beyond their 20-to-25-year warranty.”

As one may intuit, ice is a major enemy in regions with particularly cold winters. “The improper removal of ice dams has been a significant contributor to roof damage over the past several years,” says Arel. “When faced with an emergency situation caused by interior water intrusion from ice dams, some vendors believe that the solution lies in removing the ice via the use of hammers and pickaxes. While this may temporarily alleviate the problem, the net result is often significant damage to shingles and roofs. This makes for a great example as to how proper planning and hiring vendors with the correct equipment will benefit an association in the long-term.”

And the type of roof – shingled or flat – also affects its aging process.

“Shingled roofs often age prematurely, as a result of insufficient ventilation and/or insulation, and may need to be inspected more frequently,” warns Berg. “When attics can’t vent the summer heat, cooked shingles will curl and break the adhesive that holds them down, leaving an edge up to become a sail in the wind. Sometimes you can be alerted by shingles on the ground or in the gutters, but other times they seem to have vanished from the earth. When attics can’t stay cold under snow-covered roofs, they cause ice dams that can lift shingles, split wood and bend metal, whether or not it causes visible interior damage. Rubber parts and applied sealants need to be inspected for cracking, so they can be replaced before they leak. However, gutters often have to be cleaned of leaves and other tree debris in both spring and fall, which makes for two great opportunities to just inspect all of the roofing.

“And then flat roofs have both masonry and metallic elements, in addition to drains, pipes, and other membrane penetrations, so they may need regular engineering inspections as well,” Berg adds. “Minor cracking in masonry joints and membrane transitions can lead to serious problems, whose resolution come with serious price tags. So the more complicated your roofing system is, the more regular inspections you may need, and by more technical professionals.”

Balance in Budget

The more on top (pun intended) of roof-related affairs an association is, the less likely they’ll have to spend exorbitant amounts of money to fix a disaster. With that said, unpredictable calamities, however, can happen, and an association is best served tucking away some extra funds in the event of a rainy day.

“Every association should have both short- and long-term capital plans for the essential building components,” says DePaola. “We know that roofing systems have a useful life between 10 and 30 years, depending on the system and the warranties received. Therefore, the association should be funding or implementing a plan to fund – via either borrowing or assessment – for the roof replacement during the entire life cycle of the capital component. The most costly roofing projects to which we’ve been privy are those that have not been planned for and those that have been deferred for too long.”

“Having a reserve study and financial plan in place to ensure that the funds needed for capital projects exist in the association’s reserve account is the best method to avoid the significant impact of special assessments,” Arel agrees. “Proper funding is always based on proactive planning. Unfortunately, a great number of associations are under-funded, and thus do not have sufficient reserve funds required for a significant capital project. In these occasions, associations need to evaluate their options to determine what plan best suits its owners. Due to the current financial environment, a great number of associations are looking to loans to make up for their lack of reserves. This option allows an association to borrow the necessary funding, typically through a fixed interest rate loan that may cost less per month than delaying work and facing the increased costs of labor and materials. When roofs need to be replaced within a several-year period due to leaks or other severe issues, financing the project allows an association to spread out the payment over a greater span, thus resulting in a lower monthly increase.

“However,” he continues, “it’s important to note that one option is not right for all association. A board should weigh all options and the financial impacts thereof and present that to the owners. It’s important to involve the owners when making any decision that will result in a significant fee increase, such that the owners can understand the process that the board has undergone and the options available, then provide input as to what they believe is the best option to meet the association’s needs.”

Am I At Risk Of Asbestos From HSE?

Am I At Risk Of Asbestos From HSE?

Workers involved in refurbishment, maintenance and other similar trades, could be at risk of exposure to asbestos during their work. This includes:

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  • Heating and ventilation engineers
  • Demolition workers
  • Carpenters and joiners
  • Plumbers
  • Roofing contractors
  • Painters and decorators
  • Plasterers
  • Construction workers
  • Fire and burglar alarm installers
  • Shop fitters
  • Gas fitters
  • Computer and data installers
  • General maintenance staff eg caretakers
  • Telecommunications engineers
  • Architects, building surveyors, and other such professionals
  • Cable layers
  • Electricians

This list does not include all occupations at risk from potential exposure to asbestos.

When am I most at risk?

You are most at risk when:

  • the building you are working on was built before the year 2000
  • you are working on an unfamiliar site
  • asbestos-containing materials were not identified before the job was started
  • asbestos-containing materials were identified but this information was not passed on by the people in charge to the people doing the work
  • you haven’t done a risk assessment
  • you don’t know how to recognise and work safely with asbestos
  • you have not had appropriate information, instruction and training
  • you know how to work safely with asbestos, but you choose to put yourself at risk by not following proper precautions, perhaps to save time or because no one else is following proper procedures

Remember

  • you can’t see or smell asbestos fibres in the air
  • the effects of being exposed to asbestos take many years to show up – avoid breathing it in now
  • people who smoke and are also exposed to asbestos fibres are at a much greater risk of developing lung cancer
  • asbestos is only a danger when fibres are made airborne and breathed in
  • as long as the asbestos is in good condition and it is located somewhere where it can’t be easily damaged then it shouldn’t be a risk to you

Where might you find asbestos?

Some of the places where you may find it can be found in our residential and industrial building diagrams.

The section on ‘Managing and working with asbestos’ provides further information on working with asbestos.

this post was taken from and all information http://www.hse.gov.uk/asbestos/risk.htm