Why is asbestos dangerous?

Why is asbestos dangerous?

  • Asbestos still kills around 5000 workers each year, this is  more than the number of people killed on the road.
  • Around 20 tradesman die each week as a result of past exposure
  • However, asbestos is not just a problem of the past. It can be present today in any building built or refurbished before the year 2000.

When materials that contain asbestos are disturbed or damaged, fibres are released into the air. When these fibres are inhaled they can cause serious diseases. These diseases will not affect you immediately; they often take a long time to develop, but once diagnosed, it is often too late to do anything. This is why it is important that you protect yourself now.

Asbestos can cause the following fatal and serious diseases:

Mesothelioma

Mesothelioma is a cancer which affects the lining of the lungs (pleura) and the lining surrounding the lower digestive tract (peritoneum). It is almost exclusively related to asbestos exposure and by the time it is diagnosed, it is almost always fatal.

Asbestos-related lung cancer

Asbestos-related lung cancer is the same as (looks the same as) lung cancer caused by smoking and other causes. It is estimated that there is around one lung cancer for every mesothelioma death.

Asbestosis

Asbestosis is a serious scarring condition of the lung that normally occurs after heavy exposure to asbestos over many years. This condition can cause progressive shortness of breath, and in severe cases can be fatal.

Pleural thickening

Pleural thickening is generally a problem that happens after heavy asbestos exposure. The lining of the lung (pleura) thickens and swells. If this gets worse, the lung itself can be squeezed, and can cause shortness of breath and discomfort in the chest.

Note: It is also important to remember that people who smoke, and are also exposed to asbestos fibres, are at a much greater risk of developing lung cancer.

 

This post was taken from http://www.hse.gov.uk/asbestos/dangerous.htm

Managing and working with asbestos

Managing and working with asbestos

This information will be of particular interest to employers, asbestos contractors and others with duties under asbestos regulations, together with those workers currently at greatest risk from exposure to asbestos.

The importation, supply and use of all forms of asbestos are banned. However, many buildings, and some plant and equipment, still contain asbestos-containing materials (ACMs).

Before you start any work in a building that might contain asbestos (eg built or refurbished before the year 2000), you need to do the following:

Identify whether asbestos is present and determine its type and condition

  • People responsible for maintenance of non-domestic premises, have a ‘duty to manage’ the asbestos in them, and should provide you with information on where any asbestos is in the building and what condition it is in.
  • If no information is available or it is limited and you suspect asbestos may be present you should have the area surveyed and representative samples of the material you are going to work on analysed.
  • Alternatively, you can assume that any material you need to disturb does contain asbestos and take the appropriate precautions for the highest risk situation.

Carry out a risk assessment

  • Decide if its possible to carry out the building or maintenance work avoiding the risk of asbestos exposure all together.
  • If that’s not possible, identify who might be at risk and the level of possible asbestos exposure from any work.
  • On this basis, decide what work methods are necessary to provide effective control of the risks.
  • Further information on carrying out a risk assessment is available.

Decide if the work needs to be carried out by a licensed contractor

  • Most asbestos removal work will require a contractor holding a licence from HSE.
  • All work with sprayed asbestos coatings and asbestos lagging and most work with asbestos insulation and asbestos insulating board (AIB) requires a licence.
  • Identify if your work needs a licensed contractor;
  • Find a licensed contractor, or find out how to apply for a licence.

If the work is not licensable, decide if the work needs to be notified

  • If it doesn’t need a licence, you can do maintenance work on or around ACMs with the appropriate controls in place.
  • Some non-licensed work also has additional requirements, ie notification of work, medical surveillance and record keeping. This work is known as notifiable non-licensed work (NNLW).

Ensure those carrying out the work are suitably trained

  • Any worker who is liable to disturb asbestos during their day-to-day work needs to receive appropriate training to enable them to protect themselves and others.

This post was taken from http://www.hse.gov.uk/asbestos/detail.htm

Where can you find asbestos?

Where can you find asbestos? From HSE.GOV.UK

Asbestos can be found in any industrial or residential building built or refurbished before the year 2000. It is in many of the common materials used in the building trade that you may come across during your work.

INDUSTRIAL PROPERTY

Inside

1. Sprayed coatings on ceilings, walls, beams and columns

2. Asbestos cement water tank

3. Loose fill insulation

4. Lagging on boilers and pipes

5. AIB ceiling tiles

6. Toilet seat and cistern

7. AIB partition walls

8. AIB panels in fire doors

9. Asbestos rope seals, gaskets and paper

10. Vinyl floor tiles

11. AIB around boilers

12. Textiles eg fire blankets

13. Textured decorating coatings on walls and ceilings eg artex

Outside

14. Asbestos cement roof

15. Asbestos cement panels

16. Asbestos cement gutters and downpipes

17. Soffits – AIB or asbestos cement

18. Asbestos cement flue

AIB = Asbestos Insulating Board

Residential Property

Inside

A. Asbestos cement Water tank

B. Pipe lagging

C. Loose fill insulation

D. Textured decorative coating eg artex

E. AIB ceiling tiles

F. AIB bath panel

G. Toilet seat and cistern

H. AIB behind fuse box

I. AIB airing cupboard and/or sprayed insulation coating boiler

J. AIB partition wall

K. AIB interior window panel

L. AIB around boiler

M. Vinyl floor tiles

N. AIB behind fire

Outside

O. Gutters andAsbestos cement downpipes

P. Soffits – AIB or asbestos cement

Q. AIB exterior window panel

R. Asbestos cement roof

S. Asbestos cement panels

T. Roofing felt

AIB = Asbestos Insulating Board

All information in this article is only from http://www.hse.gov.uk/asbestos/building.htm website.

Are roofing tiles that act as mini solar modules a good idea?

Are roofing tiles that act as mini solar modules a good idea?

Are roofing tiles that act as mini solar modules a good idea?

Each year, thousands of Arizona residents email or call Rosie Romero’s radio show with questions about everything from preventing fires in their chimneys to getting rid of tree roots invading their sewer system. His goal is to provide answers that suit the specific lifestyle wherever someone lives in Arizona.

QUESTION: We aren’t too interested in putting solar panels on our house, but we are interested in other new roofing products, like glass tiles that also act as mini solar modules. When you buy them, you also get a battery that will let you use the solar power your roof produces and possibly keep the lights on if the electrical grid goes out. They are pretty expensive, but are they a good alternative?

ANSWER: A lot of the appeal of these roofing products seems to be based on the fact that homeowners like their looks better than that of traditional solar panels. They look like tiles that have been made out of glass. However, some versions of these tiles have been around for a while and generally don’t seem to be too effective. The tiles get too hot and then they stop working. Then they have to be replaced. Generally, they only last five to 10 years while traditional solar panels can have a 25-year life expectancy. One Web site we saw said they could cost about $22 a square foot, compared with $5 a square foot for traditional shingles.

 

Q: I recently had a contractor come in to do a whole house energy audit and to talk to me about installing solar electric panels. But he also suggested a lot of other energy saving alternatives like buying a variable speed pool pump and adding more insulation in the attic. Why did they do that?

A: It’s always a good thing to find ways to make more of your house energy efficient. But not all home energy audit companies are the same. Many times, they promote the items that have the highest profit margin and could greatly benefit the contractor if you installed them. So proceed with caution.

Q: Off and on for a long time, we’ve been considering installing solar panels for electricity. But we’re afraid that tighter regulations to solar might be coming along in future. The solar industry and the utilities always seem to be fighting with each other.

 

A: Yes, the two parties have had their issues in the past, but they seem to be getting along better now. As for more regulations, that could happen. But so far, every time the utility companies have tightened up the rules and cut back on solar benefits, homeowners that already have their solar systems have been “grandfathered in” under the old regulations. The federal tax benefits of solar have also been retained.

Q: I had a new air conditioning system installed and when the installers did that job, I had them put in an extra vent and some extra ductwork designed to help cool off a bedroom located over the garage in my home. That bedroom is one of the hottest rooms in the house and the new vent doesn’t seem to have helped very much. How can I fix this problem?

A: You may need to install some insulation in your garage in order to solve the problem. You might also be able to install a mini-split air conditioner in the bedroom or in the garage in order to cool that part of your house. A mini-split consists of a very small indoor air handler that has its own small outdoor condenser. They’re not cheap, but they’re an effective way of cooling an especially hot room or a garage.

No need to feel blue with new roof guidance

No need to feel blue with new roof guidance

Technical guidance for the construction and design of blue roofs has been released by the National Federation of Roofing Contractors.

The information was put together by the NFRC Joint Flat Roofing Technical Committee whose members included membrane and system manufacturers, insulation producers, standards and certification bodies, drainage consultants and representatives from flat roofing trade associations.

Kevin Taylor, head of technical services at the National Federation of Roofing Contractors, said: “No British or European standard covers this type of application so we were tasked with producing these notes to support the design of technically correct Blue Roof construction.

“We hope that this – like Green Roof Code of Practice (GRO) has done for green roofing – will provide comprehensive information and guidance for specifiers, designers and installers of blue roofs.”

The guidance includes sections on drainage, roof deck construction, falls, waterproofing, outlets, overflows, components and finishes.

A Blue Roof is a flat roof designed to allow controlled attenuation of rain fall during heavy and storm events as part of a Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems (SuDS) good practise policy, replicating the natural environment or improving the as built environment.

It treats and releases the water at a managed and controlled rate directly into the sewers waterways and river systems.

Kevin added: “At the NFRC we help our members plan ahead and see both green and blue roof systems as providing sustainable roof drainage solutions for our sector.”

www.nfrc.co.uk

 

Roof Maintenance

Repairing or replacing your roof can be expensive. Spending a few minutes every six months looking closely at your roof can help you identify roof maintenance opportunities that will help prevent costly repairs later. It’s also important to periodically check your homeowners insurance to make sure that serious roof damage is covered by your policy.

Roof maintenance: What to look for

It’s critical that you inspect your roof every spring and fall. A good time to do this is when you’re cleaning your gutters.

Look for missing, damaged or curling shingles and any other signs of wear and tear. It’s easy and inexpensive to replace one or two shingles, or to hire someone to do it for you.
Check for signs of fungus or algae. If your roof is starting to collect moss or algae, install zinc or lead control strips.
Inspect metal areas for rust. If it’s present, wire brush the rust, then prime and paint the metal.
Examine the flashing to make sure it’s solid. If not, remove all of the old caulk and scrub the area clean before resealing.
Seal any cracked mortar or caulking around joints and chimneys, if it appears to be deteriorating.
If you see any signs of leaking, like dark spots on the ceiling, or mold or dampness in your attic, take action immediately. Roof leaks get worse, not better, and it’s better to spend a few dollars on roof maintenance rather than a lot on a big repair.

Other roof maintenance issues

Sweep or blow off excess debris on the roof. Sticks, leaves and other debris can damage shingles, cause algae to grow and eventually clog the gutters.
Trim any branches that are hanging over the roof to prevent damage and keep squirrels and raccoons away.
A thick layer of snow accumulation could lead to roof collapse. If this happens, carefully pull the snow off the roof using a snow rake available at most home improvement stores.
Roof maintenance is often ignored, but small problems with a roof can lead to some of the most costly home repairs around.

Product, coverage, discounts, insurance terms, definitions, and other descriptions are intended for informational purposes only and do not in any way replace or modify the definitions and information contained in your individual insurance contracts, policies, and/or declaration pages from Allied-affiliated underwriting companies, which are controlling. Such products, coverage, terms, and discounts may vary by state and exclusions may apply.

Roof Shingling Tips and Tricks

Roof Shingling Tips and Tricks

Roof shingling is an easy job to do yourself, especially if you use a few shortcuts that don’t compromise the quality of your work. Keep in mind that safety should always be your first priority when it comes to doing any construction work on a roof. With the proper equipment and know-how, you will be able to complete your shingling jobs without wasting money or time.

Shingle Over Shingles

 

Some professionals will suggest that you not place new shingles over the top of existing shingles. The reason is that asphalt shingles have a lifespan of up to 20 years. Placing multiple layers of shingles will give your roof time to develop problems that can’t be easily detected if the roof is stacked with shingles. It is acceptable, however, to add new shingles over existing shingles. The rule is that there should not be more than 3 layers of shingles already placed. While this is a time saving shortcut, it is best practice to strip the roof to inspect for any damaged areas of the roof.

The Best Roof Stripping Tool

On occasion you will see do it yourself roofers armed with a crowbar to strip the shingles from their roof. The best and most convenient tool for this job is called a Roofer’s Spade. This tool is very similar to a snow shovel but is out-fitted with teeth or notches in the front of the shovel and a fulcrum underneath. This allows the prying up of the shingles and nails to be much easier than using a crowbar or a regular shovel

 

Rent a Dumpster

When stripping your roof, there will be lots of debris that will come from atop, including nails. Instead of throwing the loosened shingles and nails into the back of your truck and causing damage, you can call your local equipment rental company and rent a dumpster. This will allow you to throw the debris directly into the dumpster and call the company to pick it up when 

 

you are done.

Underlay

The purpose of underlay is to be that second layer of waterproof and leakage protection on your roof. While many professionals and do it yourself experts will disagree, an underlay is not necessary to install before you add your shingles on your roof. If your shingles are properly installed, you will not have to be concerned with any roof leakage issues. Although adding an underlay of felt has become the industry standard for asphalt shingles, it is not crucially needed.

Ice Guard

When you have completely stripped your roof of all shingles, walk the roof again to check for any nails that didn’t come up during your initial sweep. Remove them if there are any and prepare your roof for an application of roof guard. Ice guard is waterproof membrane that will help protect your roof from water damage. Ensure you follow the directions of use and application.

 

 

Bar Magnet

Trying to find all the nails that fell from your roof to the ground is an all day job that you don’t have time for. To remedy this issue, tie a rope to a bar magnet and drag it along the perimeter of your house. You will pick up all the nails that your eyes could not see.

5 tips to think about when renovating roof

5 tips to think about when renovating, repairing and replacing your roof

1. Roofs should ideally be inspected twice a year or more, both from the outside (with binoculars) and inside the loft. If you can see daylight in the loft, there may be something missing on the outside. Roof tiles or slates that have broken, slipped or been blown off are a common occurrence. If they’re not replaced, rainwater will get into the loft and cause damage there, and then in the rooms below. Other parts of the roof can cause leaks and damp, too, including the flashing, guttering and chimneys. You may be able to spot these problems yourself, but will usually need a roofer to put them right.

2.If the roof has to be retiled, do you replace the tiles like for like or go for something different, provided there are no planning restrictions? “Although handmade tiles look great, they can make the job more time consuming – you may need an experienced roofing team to manage the materials,” says Simon Braithwaite, category manager at builders merchant Travis Perkins. “Handmade tiles are also expensive. Expect to pay around £1,000 per 1,000 tiles – the average detached house requires 8,000 tiles. Another consideration is the area – if you live in a rustic village, handmade tiles may be much more in keeping with your surroundings.”


3“Handcrafted tiles, which are tiles that have been dealt with by hand during part of the production process, usually cost much less than handmade ones,” says Braithwaite. “If you have a smaller budget, machine-made clay or concrete tiles are the most affordable options. Concrete tiles can degrade in appearance and structure over time, whereas clay lasts much longer and is more aesthetically pleasing.” He continues: “Another consideration is the roof pitch – you can’t use certain types of tile on certain roof pitches because they don’t look good and could cause structural problems.”


4 If you’re overhauling a roof, think about fitting skylights (again as long as there are no planning restrictions). Skylights (also called roof windows) come in all shapes and sizes and can make a big difference to the amount of light entering the room below. If you’re doing major building work, such as an extension or loft conversion, skylights are a great addition, but they can also transform existing rooms with little or no natural light. While fitting a skylight is usually a job for a roofer or builder, experienced DIYers can fit them. You may think that skylights are expensive, but they don’t have to be – the Tyrem range at Screwfix starts at £161.22 for a 550mm x 780mm double-glazed skylight. These skylights are straightforward to fit, have a handle instead of a bar, which can make opening and closing them easier, and come with a 10-year manufacturer’s guarantee – just remember to get the correct flashing kit for the type of roof covering.


5 Flat roofs can be prone to leaks, not least because they should have a gradient, but the gradient often isn’t steep enough. If the roof is too flat or doesn’t have an adequate structure or materials under the roof covering, it will sag, allowing rainwater to pool and eventually enter the room below. The roof covering can also get damaged. If you’re building a single-storey extension, putting a flat roof on it will enable you to easily access the house above (to repair the guttering on the main roof, for example), but a pitched roof should be more reliable long term and is more aesthetically pleasing inside and out.

This post was taken from http://www.hamhigh.co.uk/property/how-to-re-vamp-your-roof-1-4905411

12 Roof Repair Tips: Find and Fix a Leaking Roof

12 Roof Repair Tips: Find and Fix a Leaking Roof

You can stop leaks yourself-no experience necessary. We show you how to track down and fix the most common types of roof leaks. Most leaks take only minutes to repair.

Roof Leak Overview

Roof Leak Overview

If you have water stains that extend across ceilings or run down walls, the cause is probably a roof leak. Tracking down the leak is the hard part; the fixes are usually pretty easy. We'll show you some simple tricks for finding and repairing most of the common types of roof leaks. But if you live in the Snow Belt and in the winter you have leaks only on warm or sunny days, you probably have ice dams. We won't go into those fixes in this story. Check out this article for more on preventing ice dams.

If you have a roof leak, you'd better fix it immediately, even if it doesn't bother you much or you're getting a new roof next year. Even over a short time, small leaks can lead to big problems, such as mold, rotted framing and sheathing, destroyed insulation and damaged ceilings. The flashing leak that caused an expensive repair bill was obvious from the ceiling stains for over two years. If the homeowner had dealt with it right away, the damage and subsequent repairs would have been minimal.

How to Find Roof Leaks

How to Find Roof Leaks

When you're trying to track down a leak, start by looking at the roof uphill from the stains. (Plus: here's how to clean roof stains.) The first thing to look for is any roof penetrations. Items that penetrate the roof are by far the most common source of leaks. In fact, it's rare for leaks to develop in open areas of uninterrupted shingles, even on older roofs. Penetrations can include plumbing and roof vents, chimneys, dormers or anything else that projects through the roof. They can be several feet above the leak or to the right or left of it.

If you have attic access, the easiest way to track down a leak is to go up there with a flashlight and look for the evidence. There will be water stains, black marks or mold. But if access is a problem or you have a vaulted ceiling, you'll have to go up onto the roof and examine the suspect(s).

A Trick for Finding Difficult Leaks

A Trick for Finding Difficult Leaks

If a leak is difficult to find, enlist a helper and go up on the roof with a garden hose. Start low, soaking the area just above where the leak appears in the house. Isolate areas when you run the hose. For example, soak the downhill side of a chimney first, then each side, then the top on both sides. Have your helper stay inside the house waiting for the drip to appear. Let the hose run for several minutes in one area before moving it up the roof a little farther. Tell your helper to yell when a drip becomes visible. You'll be in the neighborhood of the leak. This process can take well over an hour, so be patient and don't move the hose too soon. Buy your helper dinner. If running water doesn't reveal the exact location of the leak, don't be timid. Start removing shingles in the suspect area. With them removed, there'll be evidence of the leak and you'll be able to track it down right to the source. You'll see discolored felt paper or water-stained or even rotted wood directly below and around it.

Solution for a Small Leak

Solution for a Small Leak

Some roof leaks are tough to locate. Sometimes the water shows up at a ceiling spot distant from the leak. If your ceiling has a plastic vapor barrier between the drywall and the attic insulation, push the insulation aside and look for flow stains on the plastic. Often water runs to openings in the vapor barrier, such as at ceiling light fixtures.

If you can't see any telltale flow marks, and since the stain is fairly small, look at the underside of the roof for 'shiners.' A shiner is a nail that missed the framing member, in this case when the carpenter nailed the roof sheathing to the rafters. Moisture that escapes into the cold attic from the rooms below often condenses on cold nails. Sometimes you can spot this if you climb up into your attic on a cold night. The nails will look white because they're frosted. When the attic heats up a bit during the day, the frost melts and drips, then the nails frost up at night again and so on. The solution is to simply clip the nail with a side-cutting pliers.

Fix Plumbing Vent Boots

Fix Plumbing Vent Boots

Plumbing vent boots can be all plastic, plastic and metal, or even two-piece metal units. Check plastic bases for cracks and metal bases for broken seams. Then examine the rubber boot surrounding the pipe. That can be rotted away or torn, allowing water to work its way into the house along the pipe. With any of these problems, you should buy a new vent boot to replace the old one. But if the nails at the base are missing or pulled free and the boot is in good shape, replace them with the rubber-washered screws used for metal roofing systems. You'll find them at any home center with the rest of the screws. You'll have to work neighboring shingles free on both sides. If you don't have extra shingles, be careful when you remove shingles so they can be reused. Use a flat bar to separate the sealant between the layers. Then you'll be able to drive the flat bar under the nail heads to pop out the nails.

Fix Roof Vents

Fix Roof Vents

Check for cracked housings on plastic roof vents and broken seams on metal ones. You might be tempted to throw caulk at the problem, but that solution won't last long. There's really no fix other than replacing the damaged vents. Also look for pulled or missing nails at the base's bottom edge. Replace them with rubber-washered screws. In most cases, you can remove nails under the shingles on both sides of the vent to pull it free. There will be nails across the top of the vent too. Usually you can also work those loose without removing shingles. Screw the bottom in place with rubber-washered screws. Squeeze out a bead of caulk beneath the shingles on both sides of the vent to hold the shingles down and to add a water barrier. That's much easier than renailing the shingles.

Fix Walls and Dormers

Fix Walls and Dormers

Water doesn't always come in at the shingled surface. Often, wind-driven rain comes in from above the roof, especially around windows, between corner boards and siding, and through cracks and knotholes in siding. Dormer walls provide lots of spots where water can dribble down and enter the roof. Caulk can be old, cracked or even missing between the corner boards and between window edges and siding. Water penetrates these cracks and works its way behind the flashing and into the house. Even caulk that looks intact may not be sealing against the adjoining surfaces. Dig around with a putty knife to see if the area is sealed. Dig out any suspect caulk and replace it with a siliconized latex caulk. Also check the siding above the step flashing. Replace any cracked, rotted or missing siding, making sure the new piece overlaps the step flashing by at least 2 in. If you still have a leak, pull the corner boards free and check the overlapping flashing at the corner. Often, there's old, hardened caulk where the two pieces overlap at the inside corner.

Complex Roof Problem

Complex Roof Problem

This roof leaks during the snowy part of winter and during storms in the summer, certainly due to poor flashing. The soffit that meets the roof is one of the toughest areas to waterproof. In the photo, you can still see signs of an ice dam. An ice dam occurs when snow melts and the water freezes when it hits the colder edges of your roof. Eventually, water pools behind the dam and works its way back up under the shingles and under the soffit until it finds an opening through the roof.

The solution begins with good flashing, since this should stop leaks from rainfall and might stop the leaks from ice dams as well. Begin by removing the shingles down to the wood sheathing and slip a strip of adhesive ice-and-water barrier (available where roofing products are sold) under the soffit/main roof joint. Depending on how the roofs join, you may have to cut a slot to work it in far enough. It should overlap another piece of ice-and-water barrier laid below, all the way down to the roof edge. This should cover the most leak-prone areas. Then reshingle, sliding metal step flashing behind the fascia board (the trim behind the gutter). The valley flashing, laid over the joint where the two roofs meet, should overlap the step flashing at least 2 in.

If leaks continue to occur from ice dams, consider installing roof edge heating cables. (Find them locally at hardware stores or home centers.) Improved attic insulation and ventilation are usually the best ways to prevent ice dams, but they might not be effective in this complicated roof situation.

Fix Step Flashing

Fix Step Flashing

Step flashing is used along walls that intersect the roof. Each short section of flashing channels water over the shingle downhill from it. But if the flashing rusts through, or a piece comes loose, water will run right behind it, and into the house it goes. Rusted flashing needs to be replaced. That means removing shingles, prying siding loose, and then removing and replacing the step flashing. It's that simple. But occasionally a roofer forgets to nail one in place and it eventually slips down to expose the wall. Check out this article for more on installing your own step flashing.

Don't Count on Caulk!

Don't Count on Caulk!

Rarely will caulk or roof cement cure a roof leak?at least for very long. You should always attempt a 'mechanical' fix whenever possible. That means replacing or repairing existing flashing instead of using any type of sealant. Only use caulk for very small holes and when flashing isn't an option.

Fix Small Holes

Fix Small Holes

Tiny holes in shingles are sneaky because they can cause rot and other damage for years before you notice the obvious signs of a leak. You might find holes left over from satellite dish or antenna mounting brackets or just about anything. And exposed, misplaced roofing nails should be pulled and the holes patched. Small holes are simple to fix, but the fix isn't to inject caulk in the hole. You'll fix this one with flashing.

Leaks Around Brick Chimneys

Leaks Around Brick Chimneys

All kinds of bad things can happen around brick chimneys. In fact, there are far too many to cover in this story. Flashing around chimneys can rust through if it's galvanized steel, especially at the 90-degree bend at the bottom. A quick but fairly long-term fix is to simply slip new flashing under the old rusted stuff. That way any water that seeps through will be diverted. The best fix, though, is to cut a saw kerf into the mortar and install new flashing. Get complete instructions on how to install chimney flashing.

Do-It-Yourself Roofing Guide

Doing The Roofing Job / Installing Your New Roof

Preparing/Protecting The Job Area

Some general suggestions for preparing the job area:

Make sure you have a clean, organized work area. Block it off from children and pets. Identify and avoid all site danger areas, such as dangerous power lines, unsafe roof access areas, and underground hazards (such as cesspools and power lines).

Remove wall hangings as well as any loose items from walls and shelves. Use tarps to avoid damaging plants and shrubs. Park any cars or other vehicles away from the driveway and a safe distance from the construction area. Disable any sprinkler systems. Cover any pools and hot tubs, and remove any other sensitive items around the house that might be damaged by falling roofing debris.

Tearing Off The Roof And Preparing The Roof Deck

Nothing is more important in roofing than preparing the surface under the shingles. With a roof tear-off, when the old materials are removed, you’ll have a clean deck that allows you to see any potential problems that need to be fixed. This could range from rotten wood to cracked boards to an unsound deck that won’t hold nails as well.

For the proper methods for tearing off a roof and preparing the roof deck, see ourHow-To-Video .

Installing Roof Deck Protection

The proper installation of high-quality roof deck protection like Deck-Armor™ Premium Breathable Roof Deck Protection, Shingle-Mate® Roof Deck Protection, or Tiger Paw™ Roof Deck Protection is the foundation on which a good roof system is built.

See our How-to Video for installing premium deck protection .

View application instructions for roof deck protection products.

Installing Leak Barrier

Protect your investment and safeguard vulnerable areas of your roof with GAF’s proven leak barriers.

View application instructions for our leak barrier products.

Starter Strip Shingles

One of the most common sources of failure in a roof system is the improper installation of starter shingles. This starter course is very important, especially for wind resistance. Starter strip shingles are the first line of defense against wind uplift along the edges of a roof. GAF offers pre-cut WeatherBlocker™ Premium Eave/Rake Starter Strip Shingles and Pro-Start® Starter Strips.

For the proper installation technique for starter strip shingles, see our How-To Video.

Proper Shingle Nailing

Nailing errors, such as under-driven or angled nails, can cause future problems with your shingles—everything from premature failure and blistering to blow-offs. Nail type, location, length, angle, and force of application are all critical to consider when installing shingles. It’s important to take your time when installing nails to ensure the job is done correctly.

For the proper shingle nailing technique, see our How-To Video.

Installing Your Shingles

Installing Timberline® Shingles

Timberline® Shingles with Advanced Protection® Technology are the #1-selling shingles in all of North America. Timberline® Shingles will not only protect your most valuable asset—they’ll beautify your home for years to come.

For the proper installation technique for Timberline® Shingles, see our How-To Video .

View the application instructions for our Timberline® Shingles..

Installing Designer Shingles

Maximizing your property’s visual appeal with Lifetime Designer Shingles from GAF can be exciting, fun—and a smart investment.

View the application instructions for our Lifetime Designer Shingles.

How To Do Valleys

Valleys are one of the areas of roofing that takes careful planning and time to install correctly. Valleys are a prime leak area, so it’s important to be precise during installation.

See our How-to Video for installing valleys..

Installing Flashing

Wherever surfaces intersect on a roof, there is a chance of water seepage. Flashing is highly recommended for waterproofing these critical areas of your roof.

See our How-to Video for installing flashing and details.

Installing Ridge Vents

Proper ventilation is critical for helping to reduce hot and moist air in your attic space that can damage your possessions, increase your energy costs, and potentially reduce the longevity of your roofing system. The Federal Housing Authority in the U.S. the Engineered Wood Association, many national building codes, and all major roofing manufacturers require the installation of attic ventilation. GAF offers one of the industry’s most comprehensive line of ridge vents .

Installing ridge vents requires working on some of the highest parts of your roof—the ridges. Always utilize proper safety equipment to prevent falls or injury when installing ridge vents on your roof. See our Safety section for more details.

Deciding on the proper vent and the amount of ventilation needed is critical. Consult your local building code for balanced attic ventilation requirements in your area. Once you decide on the type of vent that is needed and how much to install, always ensure you install the vent as per written application instructions. Be careful not to cut any attic rafters or wires, and always ensure to properly fasten the vent to prevent blow-off or weather infiltration.

See our How-to Video for installing ridge vents.

Installing Ridge Cap Shingles

Hip or ridge cap shingles are not only a great finishing touch to your roof, they are also a critical piece of your roof system that helps to protect some of the highest stress and vulnerable areas on your roof. GAF offers premium ridge cap shinglesdesigned to match your GAF laminated shingles.

Installing hip or ridge shingles requires working on some of the highest parts of your roof—the hips and ridges. Always utilize proper safety equipment to prevent falls or injury when installing hip or ridge shingles on your roof.

See our How-to Video for installing ridge cap shingles

View application instructions for ridge cap shingles.

Installing Other Ventilation Options

GAF offers an extended line of professional-grade Master Flow® ventilation products, from whole house fans to roof louvers to turbines.

View the application instructions for our Master Flow® ventilation products

Cleaning Up The Job Site

Professional roofing contractors develop specialized techniques and equipment for keeping the jobsite clean. Tackling the job on your own, you can adopt some of these practices as well. Some quick tips are to shelter and protect bushes and plants that might be affected by material dropping from the roof, and to use a tarp to catch as much material as possible. Many roofing contractors follow a completed job by running a magnet over the "drop zone" to collect any nails that might have escaped.

Also see our section on Recycling and Waste Disposal .

How Long Will It Take?

Realistically, do-it-yourself roofing can take a lot of time and effort. It depends on various factors, such as your level of experience, the size of your roof, whether or not you need to do a complete tear-off of the existing roof, how much preparation your roof deck needs, and how many people are assisting you. Since it’s important not to leave your roof unprotected for any length of time, you must allow at least several uninterrupted days in a row to work on the project.

Keep in mind that a professional roofing contractor with a crew will finish the job more quickly and efficiently.

Locate a factory-certified GAF Master Elite® Contractor near you. >>

This post was taken from https://www.gaf.com/roofing/residential/diy/doing_the_job