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Roof Maintenance

A residential property could have triple-reinforced titanium steel walls, and it still wouldn’t be worth a darn without a sturdy roof. It’s through the roof and rooftop features that many problematic elements can enter a building

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, from wind to rain to ice to debris. And because of that, the roof must be adequately fortified and properly maintained. Otherwise, the integrity of the building – along with resident safety and property value – are bound to suffer.

Basics for Beginners

Roofs are not just complicated, relatively delicate structures—they’re also harder to keep tabs on than a facade, or windows that people look at all day. Fortunately, there are myriad experts – from property managers to A/E/C professionals to trades persons who work solely on roofs – who can do the job for your building and keep your roof in good repair.

“A roof should be inspected every few years,” says Frank Sausa, Vice President of Altura Construction Company, Inc., in Garfield, New Jersey. “If a leak gets severe enough, a homeowner’s ceiling can literally collapse. The most common cause of leaks that we see is when the rubber boot around plumbing vents deteriorates. Additionally, we often conduct repairs around chimneys, skylights and valleys, utilizing shingles, leak barrier ice and water shield, synthetic paper, step flashing, counter flashing, and, most importantly, kick-out flashings.”

Between formal inspections by a roofing professional, associations should be doing routine maintenance on their own. “Inspection of roofs should be part of the basic building maintenance, and reviewed at a minimum of a few times per month, especially during and after heavy rains or snow,” says Dennis DePaola, Executive Vice President of Orsid Realty Corp., in New York City. “Not only should the roofing surface, pitch pockets, and flashings be checked, but the floor below should be looked at as well, in order to catch even the smallest amount of water infiltration as early as possible, before any major damage occurs.”

Of course, roofs are not ‘one size fits all,’ and a maintenance schedule therefore depends on the make and age of one’s model, as well as the weather to which it’s subjected. “Appropriate frequency of inspections of a roof may depend on its age, but annually is probably a general minimum,” recommends Christopher R. Berg, President of Independent Association Managers, Inc., in Naperville, Illinois. “Severe weather conditions may necessitate specific inspections, particularly for shingled roofs. If you can see the roof from the ground, loose or missing shingles can be spotted by the board or management on a simple walk. However, many problems would only be identified via closer inspection. For example, an examination of the attic may identify leaks and problems that wouldn’t be apparent elsewhere, such as insufficiently ventilated bathroom moisture or dryer lint.”

In areas like New England, where the weather in a given year can reach sweltering highs and frigid lows, roofs can wear much faster than in more temperate regions. To be proactive, an association should perform a visual inspection of its roof on an annual basis,” suggests Tim Arel, Owner and Principal at North Point Management, which has offices in both Massachusetts and New Hampshire. “This inspection should look for missing or damaged shingles, as well as wear and warping. That will allow an association to perform the small and relatively easy repairs before they develop into serious issues that result in the need for full roof replacement, or damage to the buildings. Proactive annual inspections work to extend the life span of the roof, but they also provide information needed to plan for a roof’s eventual replacement. And they can initially be performed by qualified members of the management team, or by association volunteers. The key is to have individuals who know what they’re looking for perform these inspections. Then, when issues are identified, management and the board should contact a qualified roofing contractor to perform the needed repairs, or to provide a professional assessment with recommendations.”

Damage Done

Certain roof-based dilemmas are more common than others, so it pays for a board or management to be aware of the likely suspects.

“We’ve taken over buildings from other firms wherein we have found severe structural steel damage due to neglect, and the failure to stop water infiltration for prolonged periods of time,” notes DePaola. “In such instances, we’ve had to install shoring within apartments to offset the load from the damaged steel. That may require a relocation of the residents, depending on the severity of the situation.

“We’ve also been successful in spotting smaller repairs of roofing systems that are still under warranty, at little-to-no expense to the building owner,” he continues. “By regularly checking for these smaller repairs and addressing them in a timely manner, owners can greatly extend the useful life of the roofing system, sometimes well beyond their 20-to-25-year warranty.”

As one may intuit, ice is a major enemy in regions with particularly cold winters. “The improper removal of ice dams has been a significant contributor to roof damage over the past several years,” says Arel. “When faced with an emergency situation caused by interior water intrusion from ice dams, some vendors believe that the solution lies in removing the ice via the use of hammers and pickaxes. While this may temporarily alleviate the problem, the net result is often significant damage to shingles and roofs. This makes for a great example as to how proper planning and hiring vendors with the correct equipment will benefit an association in the long-term.”

And the type of roof – shingled or flat – also affects its aging process.

“Shingled roofs often age prematurely, as a result of insufficient ventilation and/or insulation, and may need to be inspected more frequently,” warns Berg. “When attics can’t vent the summer heat, cooked shingles will curl and break the adhesive that holds them down, leaving an edge up to become a sail in the wind. Sometimes you can be alerted by shingles on the ground or in the gutters, but other times they seem to have vanished from the earth. When attics can’t stay cold under snow-covered roofs, they cause ice dams that can lift shingles, split wood and bend metal, whether or not it causes visible interior damage. Rubber parts and applied sealants need to be inspected for cracking, so they can be replaced before they leak. However, gutters often have to be cleaned of leaves and other tree debris in both spring and fall, which makes for two great opportunities to just inspect all of the roofing.

“And then flat roofs have both masonry and metallic elements, in addition to drains, pipes, and other membrane penetrations, so they may need regular engineering inspections as well,” Berg adds. “Minor cracking in masonry joints and membrane transitions can lead to serious problems, whose resolution come with serious price tags. So the more complicated your roofing system is, the more regular inspections you may need, and by more technical professionals.”

Balance in Budget

The more on top (pun intended) of roof-related affairs an association is, the less likely they’ll have to spend exorbitant amounts of money to fix a disaster. With that said, unpredictable calamities, however, can happen, and an association is best served tucking away some extra funds in the event of a rainy day.

“Every association should have both short- and long-term capital plans for the essential building components,” says DePaola. “We know that roofing systems have a useful life between 10 and 30 years, depending on the system and the warranties received. Therefore, the association should be funding or implementing a plan to fund – via either borrowing or assessment – for the roof replacement during the entire life cycle of the capital component. The most costly roofing projects to which we’ve been privy are those that have not been planned for and those that have been deferred for too long.”

“Having a reserve study and financial plan in place to ensure that the funds needed for capital projects exist in the association’s reserve account is the best method to avoid the significant impact of special assessments,” Arel agrees. “Proper funding is always based on proactive planning. Unfortunately, a great number of associations are under-funded, and thus do not have sufficient reserve funds required for a significant capital project. In these occasions, associations need to evaluate their options to determine what plan best suits its owners. Due to the current financial environment, a great number of associations are looking to loans to make up for their lack of reserves. This option allows an association to borrow the necessary funding, typically through a fixed interest rate loan that may cost less per month than delaying work and facing the increased costs of labor and materials. When roofs need to be replaced within a several-year period due to leaks or other severe issues, financing the project allows an association to spread out the payment over a greater span, thus resulting in a lower monthly increase.

“However,” he continues, “it’s important to note that one option is not right for all association. A board should weigh all options and the financial impacts thereof and present that to the owners. It’s important to involve the owners when making any decision that will result in a significant fee increase, such that the owners can understand the process that the board has undergone and the options available, then provide input as to what they believe is the best option to meet the association’s needs.”

Am I At Risk Of Asbestos From HSE?

Am I At Risk Of Asbestos From HSE?

Workers involved in refurbishment, maintenance and other similar trades, could be at risk of exposure to asbestos during their work. This includes:

jessebridgewater / Pixabay
  • Heating and ventilation engineers
  • Demolition workers
  • Carpenters and joiners
  • Plumbers
  • Roofing contractors
  • Painters and decorators
  • Plasterers
  • Construction workers
  • Fire and burglar alarm installers
  • Shop fitters
  • Gas fitters
  • Computer and data installers
  • General maintenance staff eg caretakers
  • Telecommunications engineers
  • Architects, building surveyors, and other such professionals
  • Cable layers
  • Electricians

This list does not include all occupations at risk from potential exposure to asbestos.

When am I most at risk?

You are most at risk when:

  • the building you are working on was built before the year 2000
  • you are working on an unfamiliar site
  • asbestos-containing materials were not identified before the job was started
  • asbestos-containing materials were identified but this information was not passed on by the people in charge to the people doing the work
  • you haven’t done a risk assessment
  • you don’t know how to recognise and work safely with asbestos
  • you have not had appropriate information, instruction and training
  • you know how to work safely with asbestos, but you choose to put yourself at risk by not following proper precautions, perhaps to save time or because no one else is following proper procedures


  • you can’t see or smell asbestos fibres in the air
  • the effects of being exposed to asbestos take many years to show up – avoid breathing it in now
  • people who smoke and are also exposed to asbestos fibres are at a much greater risk of developing lung cancer
  • asbestos is only a danger when fibres are made airborne and breathed in
  • as long as the asbestos is in good condition and it is located somewhere where it can’t be easily damaged then it shouldn’t be a risk to you

Where might you find asbestos?

Some of the places where you may find it can be found in our residential and industrial building diagrams.

The section on ‘Managing and working with asbestos’ provides further information on working with asbestos.

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Roofing scam sees companies targeted by email fraudsters

Roofing scam sees companies targeted by email fraudsters

At least three roofing companies in Waterloo Region have recently been targeted by a complex scam involving recently sold houses.

Rhys Williams of The Roofman Inc. says an email requesting an estimate on replacing a certain home’s roof in Kitchener left him “a little bit suspicious.”

There was no obvious red flag, but there were a number of things about the email that seemed a little off. It had several spelling and punctuation issues. The sender had an American phone number and claimed he had learned of The Roofman Inc. through Yelp, an American website.

The property in question had recently been sold. Real estate agent Michelle Wobst says she’s aware of at least three roofing companies that received similar emails about it.

One company – concerned that they were being scammed – called Wobst to confirm if the name on the email was the name of either the buyer or the seller. It wasn’t.

“They were kind of skeptical as to why somebody would be doing the roof during the process of selling,” she said.

Another company was a little less skeptical. Last week, the seller woke up and noticed a crane in her driveway and shingles being loaded onto her roof.

That roofing company had been sent a cheque containing a full payment for the supposed roof replacement job – and a little extra. The emailer had asked them to return the difference through an email transfer.

“Obviously the first cheque isn’t going to clear, and now this guy’s out like $1,500,” Wobst says.

At The Roofman Inc., it was the third time a similar scammer had tried to get them. Williams has one piece of advice for any roofing companies unsure if a questionable request is legitimate.

“If you can’t get a face-to-face with the potential client … you should definitely consider doing more research,” he says.

Police say homeowners who see a construction crew performing unexpected work at their home around the time of a sale or purchase should contact their real estate agent to determine exactly what is happening.

With reporting by Max Wark

Man fined for dumping asbestos in NSW

Vekero / Pixabay

A man has copped a $7500 fine for dumping a load of waste mixed with asbestos next to a water plant in regional NSW.

The man from Perthville was fined after he was caught on CCTV off-loading the asbestos outside the Bathurst Water Filtration Plant in September 2017.

NSW Environment Protection Agency spokesman Sandie Jones said the cost of disposing of the asbestos legally at Bathurst landfill would have been about $35.

Instead, the illegal dumping cost tax-payers more than $4000 for the Bathurst Regional Council to employ a licensed asbestos contractor to help safely clean up the site.

“In the age of surveillance cameras, dashboard cameras and cameras on mobile phones, the chances of a witness observing waste dumpers are ever increasing,” Ms Jones said in a statement on Thursday.

Bathurst Mayor Graham Hanger said the council will be seeking to recover the costs of the clean up from those who dumped the waste.

Lung cancer, mesothelioma and asbestosis can result from an individual breathing in the fibres if they become airborne, according to Safe Work Australia.

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Retired resident troubled by asbestos in ‘leaking’ roof

Retired resident troubled by asbestos in ‘leaking’ roof

By Alex Jones in Local People

A HOUSING association has come under fire from a resident who is concerned about asbestos and repair “delays”.

Gwyn Roberts, 62, lives indepenedently in the Felin Uchaf complex in Dolgellau along with several other elderly or vulnerable residents.

After retiring early due to medical issues, Mr Roberts moved into his property, maintained by Cartrefi Cymunedol Gwynedd (CCG), five years ago.

In those five years, the 62-year-old claims he has faced an uphill battle to get his flat to an acceptable living standard and to get CCG to even respond to his complaints.

“My roof, and several others around here, has been leaking like a sieve for a long time now,” Mr Roberts told the Cambrian News.

“I’ve made numerous complaints and it’s only through constant nagging that anything is getting done.

“After 18 months of perpetual pestering I’ve managed to get them to replace my roof and my neighbouring flats too but we’re the only ones as far as I can see.

“They’ve told us to stay indoors whilst the work is ongoing as there’s asbestos in the roof – they won’t tell me what kind – so that begs the question of whether a leaky roof with asbestos in it is safe?

“I’ve spoken to other residents about it and they’ve expressed their concern too.

“I’ve seen the state of some of the roofing timbers throughout the site, something serious will happen unless the proper measures are taken.”

A CCG spokesperson said: “Many houses constructed before 1999 contain asbestos materials. When we commission any works that disrupt the fabric of the building, we check for the presence of asbestos and, if found, appropriate action is taken.

“Asbestos-related material was present in the roof of 6 and 7 Felin Uchaf and specialist contractors were appointed to have it removed.

“Following an inspection, it was also identified that the most viable solution for these properties was to completely replace the roofs.

“We have appointed contractors who are currently working on site.”

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House seller pestered for years over asbestos dispute in Oakley

House seller pestered for years over asbestos dispute in Oakley

A DISPUTE over asbestos in an Oakley house resulted in a woman being sent defamatory correspondence over a period of almost six years.

Kevin Rushford repeatedly contacted the woman after asbestos was found in a house bought by his mother.

His behaviour resulted in Rushford, 54, of Windyhill Avenue, Kincardine, going on trial at Dunfermline Sheriff Court.

He was found guilty of a charge that between December 13, 2010, and November 8, 2016, at James Hog Crescent, Oakley, he engaged in a course of conduct which caused Amanda Paterson fear or alarm by repeatedly and persistently sending correspondence to her, her employer and family members of a defamatory nature claiming she had defrauded him and she was due him money as recompense.

In his evidence during the two-day hearing, Rushford said his mother had purchased the house in 2008 and almost immediately a warning sign about asbestos had been discovered.

He told the court it cost £25,000 to have the asbestos removed and the property restored.

Rushford was found guilty by Sheriff Craig McSherry who called for reports and sentencing will take place on March 7.

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Elderly woman charged £6,000 to have roof ‘fixed’ with gaffer tape by rogue trader

More than £14,000 of damage was caused to the woman’s home in Cambridge

The woman was charged £6,000 to fix her roof with gaffer tape (Image: Cambridge Live) 

An elderly woman was charged thousands to have her roof repaired – only to discover the workman had “fixed” it with gaffer tape.

As a result the botch job caused more than £14,000 in damage and the trader was sentenced for fraud at court.

Cambridge News reported that the woman had asked JKJ Property Services to repair her gutters in December 2015.

But rogue trader, Jobie Newland, convinced her she also needed “urgent” repairs to her flat roof – saying it would cost £6,000.

The “repairs” ended up causing £14,000 damage (Image: Cambridge Live)

After the work was complete, the lady noticed water leaking and damage – the court heard.

Newland and his labourer returned twice to fix the roof, but when she couldn’t get hold of him a third time the lady called in another roofer.

The roofer showed her pictures of the condition of the roof – and Trading Standards commissioned a surveyor who reported the work was not carried out in accordance to the invoice.

The surveyor said “torch on” rubberoid had not been used, only 25mm insulation was put in place rather than 100mm – and the work would cost a staggering £14,500 to repair.

He also noticed that gaffer tape had been used to repair the leaks.

Newland was sentenced at Peterborough Magistrates’ Court (Image: Google Maps)

Newland, of Malvern Road, Grays, Essex, was charged with fraud by false representation under section two of the Fraud Act 2006.

After pleading guilty at Peterborough Magistrates’ Court on Wednesday, the 28-year-old was sentenced to a nine-week prison sentence, suspended for a year.

He was also ordered to complete 120 hours of unpaid work and pay £2,000 in compensation to his victim.

Magistrates said they took a very serious view of the offending due the “significant financial loss” and the age of the victims.

Speaking after the conclusion of the case, Cambridgeshire and Peterborough’s Head of Trading Standards Peter Gell said: “Our officers will continue to bring these type of offenders to justice, but we’d urge householders to be aware of rogue traders.

“If you are advised about urgent repairs, it’s worth considering having a survey carried out and obtaining three quotes from reputable builders or roofers.

“We won’t tolerate this type of rogue trading in our county.”

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Strong winds blow roof off Coventry house

The gable end of a roof has been blown off a three-storey town house by strong winds, leaving a pile of bricks at the foot of the property.

Firefighters shared images of the destruction caused during the early hours at the home on Burroughs Close in Stoke Heath, Coventry.

Foleshill fire station tweeted that “luckily” there were no injuries.

Severe gales have been causing disruption to much of the UK – with gusts of up to 70 mph (113 kph).

Roof end blown offImage caption“Our first thought was that it’s going to keep collapsing”, Mowa Errabou said

The family who live in the house told the BBC they were sleeping when the roof came down.

Mowa Errabou, 21, said they heard a loud bang and said “our first thought was that it’s going to keep collapsing”.

“We heard strong winds throughout the night but we didn’t think it would go this far. We kept hearing a few garden gates shut hard, but we weren’t expecting that.

“When we came outside we just saw the damage and thought, ‘wow, thank god it happened at night time’.

“We were thinking of converting the attic into a room not long ago, but thank god we didn’t.”

Elsewhere in Warwickshire, about 200 homes in Rugby are without power.

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Profile of a killer: 6 surprising facts about asbestos


Nowadays, the mere mention of asbestos is enough to send a shiver of concern through most people – and rightly so. Despite updated asbestos regulations coming into force in 2012, asbestos is still the single greatest cause of UK work-related deaths and remains a source of misery and ill-health the world over.

However, in recent human history asbestos was revered as a ‘magic mineral’, used in a wide range of commercial and industrial products and applications. Read on to discover more…

 1. Asbestos is a natural product – and still mined today

Unlike many toxic substances found in the workplace and which are manmade, asbestos is a naturally occurring material. A silicate mineral with long, thin fibrous crystals, asbestos is mined from the earth – a practice which is still carried out in Russia, China, Brazil, Kazakhstan and, up until 2011, in Canada. In 2009, two million tonnes of asbestos were mined worldwide.

2. Asbestos refers to a group of minerals

The terms ‘asbestos’ actually refers to a set of six minerals. All six are strong, heat resistant and chemically inert – properties that originally made it such a ‘desirable’ material for a range of products and applications. Of the six types, three were commonly used in the UK: chrysotile (white asbestos), amosite (brown asbestos) and crocidolite (blue asbestos). All six have been found to harm human health due to the long term damage that breathing microscopic asbestos fibres causes to the lungs.

3. We have used asbestos for almost 5000 years

The earliest known use of asbestos was in about 2,500 B.C in what is now Finland, where fibres were mixed with clay to form stronger ceramic utensils and pots. Since then it was used by most of the world’s major civilizations, including the ancient Greeks, Romans and Persians, where its fire-resistant properties were heralded by many as a form of ‘magic’. However, it wasn’t until 1858 that the asbestos industry formally began, when the Johns Company in New York began mining asbestos for use as industrial insulation.

4. Asbestos toothpaste?

It might seem incredible to us now that we are aware of its dangers, but during the first half of the driptwentieth century asbestos was used in a variety of surprising applications. Back in the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s, for example, asbestos was used to make a fake snow product that was used as a Christmas decoration. Its heat-resistant properties meant it was thought of much lower  fire risk than alternatives – and it was even used on the film set of ‘The Wizard of Oz.’ In the 1950s asbestos also appeared in the filters of some cigarettes (as if smoking wasn’t dangerous enough!)  and, perhaps most surprisingly of all, as an added ingredient in a brand of toothpaste – apparently due to the abrasive quality of its fibres!

5. Asbestos exposure kills somebody every five hours

As early as the 1930s it was understood that exposure to asbestos fibres could cause a range of health problems, the most serious of which is mesothelioma – cancer of the outer lining of the lung which is invariably fatal.  Due to the risks posed by indirect exposure, it is difficult to put an exact figure on the number killed. However, the British Lung Foundation estimate that more than 2,000 people are diagnosed with mesothelioma every year in the UK and someone dies every five hours. What’s more, in a report called Projection of mesothelioma mortality in Great Britain produced for the HSE, around 91,000 deaths are predicted to occur in the UK by 2050 as a direct result of exposure to asbestos.

6. Knowledge is key

Despite the fact that it asbestos no longer used in UK industry, asbestos related deaths are predicted to rise due to exposure of workers and others to asbestos in existing installations such a older buildings, industrial plant, older vehicles and so on. That is why the duty of occupiers to undertake surveys and to have plans for managing asbestos safely are so important. If you are unclear about the dangers of asbestos, you and your colleagues need basic asbestos awareness training, followed by training and professional advice on what you need to do to keep yourself and others safe from this potentially deadly substance.

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Asbestos encapsulation: why removal isn’t always the best option

Asbestos: the background

Asbestos was extensively used by the UK construction industry from the 1950s to the mid-1980s for a wide range of applications, the most common being fireproofing and insulation.

Take the education sector, for instance. From the 1950s to the 1980s, ‘system buildings’ were one of the most popular methods of erecting school premises. However, this method of construction relied on structural columns being fireproofed with Asbestos Containing Materials (ACM).

Asbestos: the current picture

Although asbestos was made illegal in 1999, it’s highly probable that any building that was built before the year 2000 contains some form of asbestos.

Asbestos encapsulation: why removal isn't always the best optionAccording to the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) asbestos materials in good condition are considered safe unless asbestos fibres become airborne, which happens when materials become damaged. And it’s these ‘damaged’ particles that have been proven over the years to present a health risk, with asbestos being linked to diseases, including lung cancer, asbestosis, diffuse pleural thickening, and mesothelioma

Given this risk, individuals and companies responsible for maintaining and repairing premises have a duty to manage asbestos as part of the Control of Asbestos Regulations, which came into force in 2012.

What’s more, an abundance of Government-funded research and funding has resulted in many schools being tasked with the challenge of finding an asbestos management solution that suits their property and meets their budget and timescale.

However, what many people do not realise is that according to Health and Safety Executive (HSE) regulations, asbestos that is in good condition, can be left where it is, providing an in-place management plan is exercised.

Why opt for encapsulation over removal and what are the benefits?

While asbestos removal may seem like the obvious choice for dealing with asbestos, it’s often complicated, expensive and can result in extensive downtime. In contrast, asbestos encapsulation within a seamless, protective coating is possibly the safest and most cost effective method of asbestos management. It involves relatively little disturbance of the asbestos, therefore minimising risk.

But that’s not the only advantage to asbestos encapsulation. For example, roofs are an area where asbestos tends to be rife, with an estimated 1.5 million non-domestic properties reported to have an asbestos roof. Opting to encapsulate roof asbestos as opposed to removing it:

  • Eradicates the need to dispose of the material, which can be hazardous, costly and is subject to strict controls
  • Can be completed more efficiently which, in turn, reduces overall disruption, on-site time and any associated costs

How does asbestos encapsulation work?

Encapsulation involves covering the asbestos with performance coating that predominantly:

  • Protects and repairs any damaged asbestos and seals any exposed, raw asbestos edges
  • Increases the useful life of the material
  • Reduces any fibre release through general degradation
  • Protects against accidental knocks and scrapes
  • Improves the overall appearance of the material

Special polyurea products are used to apply the coating, which typically only has to be applied once and can often seal asbestos that’s present in hard to reach places. What’s more, another advantage offering by the coating is that it’s less likely to flake or crack over time.

Compared to other more traditional materials like polyurethane and epoxies, polyurea technologies offer fast and reliable application. Touch dry in a matter of minutes, layers can be built up quickly, which means a site can return to service in hours, rather than weeks.

A plural component spray, polyurea technologies are renowned for outperforming all other performance coatings when it comes to preventing or bridging dynamic cracks, providing durability and the ultimate layer of protection. With no VOCs, polyurea technologies are also ideal for environments where health and safety is of primary concern, as well as buildings that will remain occupied during the application process.

As with any polyurea treatment, encapsulation is conducted by trained staff in controlled conditions and in accordance with the latest industry regulations and standards. Although every encapsulation is tailored to each site, most processes tend to typically involve adequately preparing the area to ensure the best possible results and regular follow up checks to assess the condition of the asbestos over time.

While many people’s instinct might be to remove asbestos, it’s worth remembering that it’s not necessarily the safest or most cost effective solution. Providing the asbestos is deemed to be in good condition, taking the route of asbestos encapsulation is a highly effective, more affordable way of managing asbestos, not to mention, less hazardous and more efficient.

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